Are asthmatics who post on social media one reason why asthma is considered as “just asthma”?

How often do we read or hear that asthma is “just asthma” and an inhaler will fix it all. Everyone knows someone who has asthma but not everyone knows how bad asthma can be and that it kills people. 3 people die each day in the UK compared to the 10 across the United States. I am not saying that 10 is acceptable but compared to the UK it is far better. In fact the UK has the worst asthma death rate for a developed country.

The big question is why do we have such bad statistics?

We have the National Health Service, Asthma UK, 2 dedicated research centres- the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research and the Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms in Asthma which is providing asthmatics with cutting edge technologies and trying to get a better understanding of asthma, the different types of asthma and best ways to manage it. Despite having all this, asthma as a condition is horrendously underfunded when you compare the funding given to cancer or heart disease. Asthma is way more prevalent yet still not fully understood. To begin to understand asthma, and the different phenotypes (types) there needs to be a huge input of money much like there is for other conditions.

Why is money not being given to improve outcomes of those with asthma? 

I believe that we as asthmatics have a role to play in this specifically the role that we play on social media. Over the last decade social media has exploded. Everyone (although there are some exceptions) uses social media of some sorts wether it is Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or LinkedIn. It is used for both social and professional use and although there are some restrictions in place you can post pretty much anything and it can be available to most who are looking for it.

I use social media in a number of different ways. Through Facebook, Instagram and my blog I can share my advocacy work and awareness about the condition, how I deal with it both the negatives and the positives, and also new medications that are coming out as well. Twitter is an excellent vehicle for knowledge exchange specifically for research as you can share snap shots of what is happening and not need to search a website and read through screeds of stuff.

Olivia_Fulton_Logo_Primary

On Facebook one of my roles is that I moderate and administrate several support groups for those with asthma, severe asthma, difficult to control asthma etc. I feel very honoured that I have been asked to become a member of the admin team for these groups however it is tricky. Many of these groups can be accessible to anyone who wants and people can post what they want, equally they can post what they want on their own pages too. I believe this is where asthma or more specifically asthmatics get a bad reputation and unfortunately when someone reads something in one place then an entire groups can be tarnished with the same brush.

What am I actually talking about? I often get into trouble or arguments with people because they are not acting responsibly and not taking their condition seriously. This would be fine if they were keeping this to themselves but many are not, instead it is being shared on social media. For example:

“my breathing is really bad and having to use way more nebulisers than I should so need to go to hospital but I have stuff to do first”

This type of thing I come across on just about a daily basis and it makes my blood boil. We have a role wether we like it or not to take our asthma seriously and get help when we need it. Part of me feels that anyone on the outside seeing this would think why should be invest lots of money in asthma when those with asthma are not being sensible with it.

I firmly believe if you need to get help you need to get help, a shower, shopping, housework etc can wait. If you don’t wait you might not be there to do it in the future. No one likes going to hospital and many with severe asthma spend a lot of time going to hospital resulting in admissions and plans changing. It is not ideal but it is what it is.

I have had 2 friends die from asthma and know of many others through my work with Asthma UK and being involved in support groups that have also died. For some of them the reason they died most likely could have been avoided had they got help when they first started feeling unwell. I am sure if I was able to ask them they would say they wished they got help sooner as they might still be here now.

I use the examples of these 2 friends in response to comments people leave like above. This will often cause many to get angry with me but if you are unwell you need help there and then. People do not see this and expect sympathy and attention but if you do not act responsibly then you are not going to get sympathy. If you really want to live then you need to go and get help. There have been times when I have just wanted to pretend asthma is fine and I don’t need help because I have something on and don’t want to miss it but then I think of Dawn and it jolts me back to earth forcing me to get help.

Wether we like it or not we are ambassadors for the condition. The outward projection we give I think has a large part of why asthma is not taken seriously. I am blunt and will say to people that if they want their asthma to kill them then they are going about it the right way. It is very blunt but it is the reality.

I know for sure there will be people who read this and have posted irresponsibly  who will be angry. I do care that they will be angry but at the same time I don’t because what we post on social media can influence others with asthma who may be new to the condition and they don’t know any better and think what they read is ok to do. Remember asthma can kill anyone not just those with severe asthma so those new to the condition may see stuff and think because someone who has had asthma longer than they have must know best and it is ok but it is not. We must lead by example and if we are not going to then we must keep this private and to ourselves.

So how much is social media playing a role in the reputation that asthma has. I will continue to try and get people to understand why asthma must be taken seriously and that when you need help for your breathing you need help and should not go and have a shower etc first because you think this is the priority.

I am an ambassador for asthma as we all are. Asthma needs to be respected much like other chronic health conditions are and it is not acceptable to post irresponsibly on social media for others to see and be influenced by. We desperately need more funding to understand asthma better and if we can do our part to help achieve this we might get there quicker than we are now.

Rant over but bottom line is: social media can be toxic in how people view asthma because of what those with asthma post for the public to see.

RIP Dawn

248405_2175783153257_1886811_n

Sick leave- what do you do??

Being on sick leave seems to be an all too common occurrence for me. It is never just a day either its weeks and weeks which feels like months and months (well sometimes it is months).

Often people say to me they would love to be off for as long as I have been off and it must have been nice. I hate saying its not and Im glad to be back but it is the truth. I hate being off as I do love my job. I think when you are at work and having a really hard, difficult day the idea of being off is just great, and then when you have had a week of annual leave that has gone by in just a flash you long for more time off to have a good recharge so when someone is off for a extended time you think it would be bliss but to me it is far from that.

Time stands still, it feels like it moves backwards, hours drag and minutes feel like hours. It is ok when I am in hospital and unwell because you feel so awful- time stands still in a different manner, you want time to speed up so you will be out the attack and find it easier to breathe but it doesn’t speed up, again it takes forever but once out the initial terrifying difficulty to breathe has passed you are left feeling exhausted and time just passes as you dose on and off requiring medication in-between but time just passes in a haze so you really have no idea about time or what day it is. This bit is ok as you really do feel ill and just curl up.

With asthma the tricky bit is when you feel better but you feel better when doing nothing and I mean doing nothing. Lying on a bed you are totally fine, breathing is good, heart rate is comfy, pain is at a low and all seems ok with the world until you need the toilet, shower, something to drink and thats it. Your lungs tighten up, heart rate sky rockets and pain rips through your lungs and you think to yourself all you did was stand up and take a few steps but feel like you have just run a marathon. This is when time is at an ultimate go slow. There is only so much lying on your bed or sitting on the sofa you can do. There is only so much day time TV or on demand TV and films you can watch.

They say rest is good for you, enforced rest is even better for you but even harder especially when you know that any movement you do will cause you to feel pain and go backwards. It is frustrating and difficult. Many of my friends with asthma and other lung diseases know exactly what it is like and share my frustrations. For me it makes getting back to work difficult because doing nothing you feel invincible but when do you know that you are ok to go back to work?? It is a hard call and loving work means you want to go back as soon as possible.

I find my self very fortunate as I have my patient and public involvement stuff which I can occupy myself with when having to be inactive and resting. It keeps my brain really active and i feel like I am doing something good with my down time. It is important and it stops me dwelling on what I imagine I should be doing. I would torment myself otherwise. Also writing this blog and the various support groups I am in helps me through it all but I know others don’t have that which is why I am so passionate about PPI because of the impact it has had on me. I am sure I would have long given up the prospect of even returning to work or do anything had I not had a such positive experience being involved in research. It has made the time that stands still move on and passes and soon it is the day to return to work.

How do I know when I am ready to go back to work properly and actually ready rather than my brain is super bored and I need to do something? This time it has taken me longer to go back to work which Im not ecstatic about however over the past week I have noticed how many people say how much better I am looking and how my breathing appears and sounds. This is the first time in a very long time that people have said positive things about how I look or appear compared with how I look like death warmed up and sound like I have swallowed a whistle. It think this is down to a combination of things, 1 having a better steroid regime which is preventing the dip I kept having late on in the day, 2 switching medical team to a new consultant, asthma nurse etc and having confidence in this team and knowing that things are getting looked into compared to before, and lastly I have been off longer but then I was kept longer in hospital and was reliant on less nebulisers when I was discharged than when I am admitted to the Royal and get discharged often before I can even walk the length of the room and often just bounce back in meaning I am not great and more stress on my body. So there is a number of different factors this time that have changed.

The last few days have been a great test for me to see how I really am doing. Going in to work to help with registrar peritoneal dialysis teaching which I really enjoyed and felt like I was useful. I must say I do love teaching but not just the teaching about something but instilling in the teaching and training how important the patient is and not just to get them better but respecting their choice and understanding what is important to them. I feel in renal this sometimes can be over looked especially when a patient chooses peritoneal dialysis as the work up can be longer and if they suddenly decline and require dialysis without a second thought a temporary line is stuck in them and then thats them on haemodialysis.

Today was also another great check to see how the lungs were doing. I attended a collider to discuss ‘Decision Support for Asthma’ which was industry partners, researchers, clinicians as well as patients to brain storm ways to help those with asthma. It was a fascinating meeting and what was clear was the passion of all those that attended to help people with asthma. Ideas were not the same in the groups but the patient and patient choice was at the centre. As a patient it was great to share what is useful and what is not useful to living with asthma. I will write a different post about this as I hope it will have positive outcomes and lead to new innovations.  I was tired by the end of the day but a good tired and not too chesty either despite the really hot weather and humidity (which I think will only get worse as the weekend goes on!!).

 

So fingers crossed when I see the GP on Wednesday she gives me the thumbs up to go back to work and some normality can return to my life!!!

World Asthma Day

On Tuesday 1st May is was World Asthma Day. I normally do something during the day, or post a video etc raising awareness about asthma, how serious it is, how  critically under funded research into asthma is. This year however I didnt do anything I just wasn’t well enough, my chest was far from good and lacked any ability to concentrate and focus on anything, mainly due to the high doses of prednisilone which leave you with a mind that has been put in a blender and constantly mixing your thoughts up and also due to the lack of sleep again thanks to the prednisilone but also my breathing has been getting worse in the late afternoon, evening and into the night making sleep difficult.

But World Asthma Day 2018 was recognised by Asthma UK with a huge thunderclap on how to deal with asthma attacks which reached far and wide across social media. However there was some very disappointing news also announced which is devastating and really makes you think how, why and when will those in power do something about it.

What Im talking about is the UK’s statistic on asthma deaths.

World Asthma Day 2014 saw the publications of the National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) which showed the devastating numbers of people dying from asthma but also that over 2/3 of those deaths would have been preventable had they received the correct asthma care including having an asthma action plan in place, having regular asthma reviews and also correct inhaler technique. The publication of NRAD was meant to be a turning point in asthma care given the shocking statistics. I remember at the time thinking it was bad and that so many people shouldn’t be dying from asthma so you can imagine my shock, upset, dismay when I woke up to hear that asthma statistics have not got any better in the last 4 years in-fact they have got worse. Asthma deaths are 20% worse than they were 4 years ago making asthma statistics in the UK as the 5th worst across Europe and only one of three countries whose death rate increased rather than decreased. It is really shocking but then I sit and think a bit more about it and am I really surprised? I don’t think I am. I didnt think the rate would have increased as much as it has but if Im honest as a patient I really don’t see any changes that have had a big impact on asthma management, and if there are no changes there then there won’t be much of a change in the statistics.

As a patient who has asthma and does use a variety of NHS services because of my asthma I have not noticed any changes in how asthma is managed and monitored. I know my asthma is not run of the mill asthma and is more complex therefore GP’s and asthma nurses in primary care do not have a lot of input into my care other than my annual asthma review which the asthma nurse does at the GP survey. However the review tends to be me updating them on the new research that is out and what new treatments are available. I am often told that I know my asthma better than anyone so they are going to let me self manage but will be there if I need them. I understand why they do this however as a life long asthmatic and a very difficult to control asthmatic I cannot remember the last time I had my inhaler technique reviewed. I don’t think I am doing it wrong as take my inhaler the same way I always have. I also don’t have a written asthma action plan. I have bugged my (now old) consultant for one because being on maximum doses of inhalers I don’t have room to move should I get a cold or chest infection. Now that I am going to have a different consultant who i hope to have a better relationship with and will work with me rather than against me or just not work with me at all leaving me to do most of my management and hoping for the best (mostly I think i do the right thing!). But this got me thinking, how many other asthmatics like me who are difficult to control are just left to do their own thing because the asthma nurses they see say the same as mine that they are far more knowledgable than they are.

One of the other problems I see often and I think is a potential barrier  to reducing the number of deaths due to asthma is those who have asthma give it the respect it deserves and be sensible with it. Due to the difficulty I have with my asthma and the isolation I feel as a result of it I am in several support groups for asthma, brittle asthma and difficult to control asthma. It is here where you can chat to people who know exactly how you feel, how debilitating it is and the frustration  you feel when you try to do everything right but still your asthma is not behaving.

These groups are a great source of support however there is one very concerning theme which keeps recurring which no doubt is also a factor for so many asthma deaths and this is not getting help early.

I will often see posts made by people saying they have been using whole inhalers in a couple of days, or they are struggling to talk and having an asthma attack and they don’t know what to do. In these groups we do not give any medical advice but would suggest the person concerned follows their asthma action plan to which some would reply saying they don’t have on, or that they go and get seen by a GP or hospital. Again some group members would respond saying the GP does nothing except give them steroids or send them to the hospital. There is also the situation at night when GP practices are closed so you need to phone NHS24 and they will assess if you need to be seen by a Dr. Many people again don’t see the point in going to out of hours because they don’t know you so wouldn’t be able to do much. It really frustrates me when this happens. I can understand that asthma is very tricky to deal with as there are so many different phenotypes so seeing your own GP is preferable but it won’t always happen that way and more than likely it is during the night when you start struggling to breathe.

Now for the last, most serious, and riskiest behaviour that also occurs in these groups which could quite easily cause death. What am I talking about is when people post photos of their oxygen saturations or heart rate accompanied by a comment about how much they are struggling and finding it difficult to talk and don’t know what to do. Again naturally you would offer support and see what they have already taken, followed their action plan and if all this has been done the next step is to go to A&E to be reviewed, have their chest sounded and some treatment if needed to get their chest and asthma back under control. The problem occurs when you have given them some advice and recommendations like they asked for however they don’t take it. Many say that going to A&E is a waste of time because they get told their oxygen saturations are ok and their chest is wheezy but they will be ok. They may be given some nebulisers and prednisilone and allowed home. They see this as a waste of time as some feel they can do everything they are being given in A&E. They don’t see the value of attending as they see it as just getting some medication but actually the Dr or nurses are assessing them to see how much effort they are putting into there breathing and if they are using their accessory muscles to help, they will also have bloods taken which can show if they have any infection and require antibiotics. So it might not seem that much is being done but there is a whole assessment taking place. Then there are another group of severe asthmatics who won’t go to A&E early as they feel they are always up at the hospital being admitted for their asthma or being seen in outpatient clinic so they want to maximise their time at home so will stay there until they are really struggling which is when it gets dangerous as an urgent ambulance is often required and the resus room is on standby for you so you get treated straight away and stabilised before moving to a ward. I don’t think people realise that by staying home longer they are taking a big gamble that they will okish by the time the ambulance arrives and takes  them to the hospital. The longer they leave it the longer and harder it is to get back to baseline and the more medication to help relax the constricted airways. This also means that they will require additional medications to treat the asthma and any infection present plus more medications for the side effects of prednisilone.

By delaying when you decide to go and get help because your asthma has got more difficult is critical because you don’t know how severe the attack may be and if your out with a bad chest you may be exposed to triggers and because your not well your airways are going to be more sensitive.

I guess the message I am trying to get across is that no matter how busy you are in life or how much you feel you spend off work and in the hospital nothing makes up for not having a life which is what will happen if you don’t go and get help early for your asthma.

Taking time helps to heal

The first week of annual leave I really felt a little bit of a mess and just didnt know what to do with myself and everything seemed really negative and falling apart around me, but a week in and half way through my annual leave I feel things are starting to get back together and I feel much better for it.

I have had time this week to sit, think and evaluate what it important, what I should prioritise and what I shouldn’t but also to look at what is important to me both in terms of what I like and want to do but also in terms of what is going to keep me healthy and well.

I didnt go to the World Cup to volunteer and to say I was down in the dumps about it would be an under statement. I didnt think I would feel as down about it as I did. It shocked me just how much it effected me but its been for the good. I have been able to watch all the games live over a web stream which if i sit back and think about it I wouldn’t have got to watch all the games if I was there volunteering as would be working and doing stats rather than watching the lacrosse for sheer enjoyment and trying to work out plays and watch how decisions are made and coaches change their tactics according to how games are progressing has been great fun so there are positives of not being there.

I also got a lovely message from the Scotland team today as well thanking me for what I have done which brought a wee tear to my eye. That team are a really special one and each member I really value and glad to be part of their prep to the World Cup so I hope each and everyone of them is enjoying the experience.

This next week I am going to London on Sunday and doing a talk along with some other bits and pieces then coming back home again.

I will be able to spend the rest of my time up north at the cottage for a few days working on various bits of research I am doing and have a new role as part of a patient advisory group for the European Lung Foundation too which is exciting. I am already a patient advisor for a study they are leading but really looking forward to something different with this role.

I thought the 2 weeks were really going to drag as I wasn’t doing what I had planned a while ago and I sort of put it to the back of my mind my annual leave as I knew thinking about it would also bring about thoughts of what I should have been doing but wasn’t able to but I have had so much support from friends that the week flew by and I am sure the next one will to and I will be moaning about wanting to be back on annual leave rather than working!

I need to do some resting as chest wise its been a wee struggle this last week more so than has been for a while but I think thats because the weather has been quite muggy and humid never an asthmatics friend! So hopefully the rain that is pelting down just now will clear the air to make for happy lungs and happy breathing!!!!

#aukcarASM15

IMG_0653

The last few days I have been down in Manchester at the Annual Scientific Meeting for the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research. It was a great few days. all kicked off by an entertaining dinner with the centre director and post grad and network co-ordinator who learnt the value of Twitter and what you can do with it. It was with delight that one member found they were my top media tweet and wanted to retain this title for the whole meeting. (no one really knew what top media tweet was but battle had commenced).

I was particularly excited about the meeting for two main reasons because I was co presenting about @SPEAKAsthma and also I was going to hear Prof Iain Pavord talk who is in my eyes the asthma guru and brought Bronchial Thermoplasty to the UK. Listening to him talk was amazing. It gave me a renewed sense of hope that there were different treatments coming out for asthma, namely Mepolizumab. His different views on the use of oral steroids was interesting as I had always thought steroids would treat all aspects of asthma but now I know otherwise. It does make me question the role of oral steroids for myself. I have never been convinced that they are as good as medics make out. It will be interesting when I am next in clinic brining this information I have learned. Prof Pavord also knows my consultant and spoke highly of her. I think highly of her but that is because she has helped me so much, but when you get the top guy in asthma saying your consultant is good, she must be good.

Our talk about @SPEAKAsthma and a new project was great and we were able to show our recruitment video and a flipagram that we put together. I did get a bit nervous and stumbled over my words sometimes but I think the PPI Research Fellow I was presenting with caught my bad bits and saved me.

IMG_0613

Otherwise the meeting was good. It was different this year from last year in Oxford. I was very new last year and really didnt know many people but this year I have had the chance to work with a lot of people and met them over the year. This year we also had a big PPI presence as there were 7 of us attending. The great thing about the meeting and the centre is that they value PPI input so much and are really inclusive of it. There is no one who didnt make us feel welcome. Even at breakfast and  other meals they would stop conversation and welcome us and speak to us wanting out advice and input on their various projects.

There is so much to talk about in the meeting and way too much to put down on paper but my titter feed sums up the meeting as I tweeted throughout it. If you want to see go to @just_TUX to see my tweets.

The second day was really frustrating for me. It was really interesting but I couldn’t contribute as much as I wanted because I was up most of the night coughing and feeling really tight chested. It was horrible. I was determined not to let people know I didnt feel great but by the end of the day I felt exhausted and the effort of breathing was so much. I am really annoyed at myself for pushing through and not just excusing myself and resting somewhere. I have this bad mentality where I won’t let my health stop me doing things at any cost. By the end of the day at the train station on the way home I didnt have the energy to hide how I felt anymore and had to just sit on a bench and try catch my breathe. Once on the train it was impossible I felt slumped and had my neb. I must have appeared so anti social but I was spent and on empty. It was such a shame as the end of the last meeting was such a high and the train journey on the way back was full of chatting and discussing different things we were going to be doing in the near future.

I am really looking forward to the next few months. There have been lots of different projects that people want PPI input for and also the SPEAKAsthma group to which is exciting as they are still really new so the group is only just starting out but it bodes well if people are keen to speak with them and also have a group set up in London too!!! The future is looking good for SPEAKAsthma and PPI!!!

#aworldthatcanbreathe

Today I met Ron and Linda MacDonald, the parents of Lydia MacDonald who tragically died from an asthma attack in June this year. I remember reading about this in the newspapers as Lydia’s wee boy was left in her flat for a few days after she died. At the time of reading I thought ‘not another one’. Another one being another person who has died as a result of an asthma attack. I felt for her parents at the time as no parent should loose their children.

Rather than sit back and do nothing, Lydia’s parents have set off on a campaign to both raise the profile of asthma and how dangerous it can be but also to fundraise for vital research which is chronically under funded. I am totally in awe of their strength, as in a few shorts months they have achieved so much awareness and want to continue with this.

I am so glad to have met Lydia’s parents- I was a bit apprehensive as asthma is a subject very close to my heart and one I can get very upset about as feel it has taken so much away from me. I was not sure if I would be able to keep my emotions in check. Part of me thought I shouldn’t show my emotions as I am still here. I still have my family- parents, brothers, sister, grandparents, nephew and niece whereas Lydia’s parent don’t have her and her son doesn’t have a mum. It is heart breaking thinking that. To know that someone so full of life had it all taken away.

So many things that both parents said resonated with me a few of them are:

  • there are so many different types of asthma
  • no one really gets how bad asthma can be not even friends
  • despite having bad asthma wanting independance
  • unless you have suffered an asthma attack you have no way of knowing how terrifying it really is
  • its not just asthma
  • asthma kills far too many people

These are just a few things but these are the things which people need to read and take on board to stop more families going through what Lydia’s family have and are going through.

I briefly had a look at the page called Lydia MacDonald Tribute fund for Asthma Research UK on Facebook and already the plans and party in the future appears to be gaining momentum and there are a huge number of comments in support. I will endeavour to support or help in anyway I can to raise funds or awareness about asthma. Lydia’s parents mentioned about getting all the communities together to one huge event with everyone working together as it is all for the same cause.

A phrase I heard several times from Lydia’s mother was that she just wants to to help make it a world where you can breathe. I am not sure if this the tagline so to speak for what they are doing but I have used it as a hashtag in my twitter when tweeting and also on various other social media sites to raise the profile of what Lydia’s parents are doing for people with asthma. The hashtag is:

#aworldthatcanbreathe

Emotions and detachment

This evening I feel totally drained and really emotional but the feeling is strange it is almost a detachment from what I should feel. I can’t really describe it. I think it perhaps is a coping mechanism I have when dealing with a certain situation I don’t like and don’t have a choice to avoid.

What am I talking about?

An asthma attack. Previously I have written about how my method of coping with life threatening asthma attacks is to not remember what happens. Until today I never thought of the implications that this has. By not only blocking out my own memories of the attack I also block out my own memories of my parents worry and looks on their faces and how they feel knowing their daughter can’t breathe and could be heading to intensive care if it doesn’t get turned around.

Today I met 2 inspirational people who in the face of a very tragic situation are trying to make a positive. Their daughter died of an asthma attack. She was a similar age to me- just a year younger. At her funeral they were shocked at how many people didnt know how bad asthma could be and they have pledged to raise money for asthma research to help find that cure that everyone with asthma hopes for but no one knows where to find it. I was in awe meeting them as I had no idea how they could be so strong in such sad circumstances.

Listening to her mum talk made me think of my parents and what they must go through if they have to take me to hospital or when they are sitting in hospital with me. I have never even thought about how they feel when seeing me not able to breathe. I block it all out so I don’t remember any of it. I am scared to ask them if they are scared or worried about what may or may not happen. Part of me wants to know but then i am scared. I know I can’t stop having asthma attacks but the thought that those who protect you fear for you makes me upset. It is like inflicting pain but the last thing you wanted to do was cause it.

Hearing Lydia’s parents experience made me grateful that I am here but at the same time it has highlighted the very reality of asthma particularly when they talked about how she was fine and looked fine but the next minute they could be calling an ambulance. This is what it feels like for me when I have an attack. I never knew others had attacks like that. It feels when reading about attacks that everyone’s are different but for the first time there is someone whose family described their attacks the same as mine. It has made me want to be more vigilant with my asthma control. I am already doing my utmost but I still have days where I do things I shouldn’t such as a few weeks back playing goalie at lacrosse or going into work when I really should have stayed at home.

I have lost too many friends to asthma and this is another family who has lost a daughter and mother because of asthma. I want to help in any way I can to raise the profile of asthma and how serious it can be a even friends who I have known for 20 years don’t know how serious asthma can be and they should. I don’t want to use shock tactics but asthma does kill and its the reality. So…..

#aworldthatcanbreathe