Did you know severe asthma is way more than only severe asthma??

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How did I end up with 6 other conditions plus just from one medication I take for severe asthma. The scary thing is I am not alone.

This word cloud represents all the conditions a small selection of people have as a result of severe asthma. I asked a support group on social media as I am becoming more and more aware of my growing list of conditions. I started off with only asthma and now have: GERD, Osteoporosis, Adrenal Insufficiency, Steroid induced Diabetes, Optic Nerve Neuritis with peripheral vision loss, chronic pain due to lung adherence to chest wall, depression, anaphylaxis, steroid induced myopathy, and this is just what has been diagnosed there are a host of other side effects as well which are a collection of symptoms rather than conditions.

I know my asthma is on the severe end of the spectrum and this type of asthma is very rare but it is shocking that for 33 I have all these conditions all as a result of having asthma and the medication required to control it.

I asked a group of 30 different people of varying ages and almost all of them had at least 4 other conditions that they did not have before they ended up with severe asthma.

I think this just highlights the chronic misunderstanding asthma has. We rely on medications that ravage our bodies to help our lungs. If we did not take these medications many of us would be dead however with the medication we are facing life shortening conditions.

How do we change this? How can we prevent severe asthma causing all these other conditions. You see advances being made in other chronic conditions where new medications are coming out that are life changing and do not come with side effects that just multiply not only your condition list but also your medication regime.

It is a side of asthma that no one ever knows or sees. I am sure the list of conditions I gathered is not all of them and if I asked a wider group of people there would be even more conditions in the word cloud.

Hopefully by sharing this and highlighting this insight it will educate even just one person as to how much severe asthma can destroy a life.

Severe asthma does not end up as only asthma there is a whole lot more that goes along with it too.

Recovery- its not easy and so frustrating!!

One thing I have become very aware of is how we adapt to recovery in different ways. This last hospital admission has really highlighted that to me as recovery has been far from straight forward and a totally new experience for me- even after getting my knee operated on was easier than this.

Previously when discharged from hospital  including critical care admission I have been focused on rehabbing my lungs and getting myself back to my baseline so I can get back to work and back to doing the things (I know there will be many reading this laughing saying I run back to do all sorts before I am ready and need to take more time- my family mostly).

The physical insults on my body as a result of a severe asthma attack are normal. The dot to dot of bruises were there have been attempts at bloods being taken, injections, arterial stabs and then of course the cannulation attempts and the effects of keeping that cannula in for 10 days (7 days longer than meant to but it still worked so it was staying put) because despite the burning while the potassium, magnesium, salbutamol or aminophylline going through it still worked and you could take a decent rate of fluid going through it, but these all fade. The battle wounds disappear not long after getting home. They cause no real pain and do not last (except a few scars but you don’t notice them).

This time it feels like everything has been flipped on its head. The physical insult is still with me and will no doubt be with me for months and as many people have told me it is likely to be a painful recovery. This is a totally new experience for me. The physical insult is still visible as well. My leg is black and blue which seems to be getting better now but it is taking its sorry time. This is the only outward sign from my last admission.

To look on the positive side of having a foot which I have no feeling or sensation in, a leg that has this burning nerve pain that sears through it any time I move has meant I have been resting….ALOT. I have been confined to sitting or lying as much as possible. This has been fantastic for my lungs and post hospital lethargy. My mum commented how much my lungs have recovered from this admission but it did not escape her that i have had an enforced rest due to my leg being in such a state.

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It has really broken me not being able to just bounce back, even being able to just get back and have independence. When you are unwell in hospital it is ok to ask for help for things like getting about, up to the toilet or even help with a wash but once home these are tasks I feel I should be able to do without thinking. If I need to get something I now need to think about it:

  • what am I getting up for
  • do I have my leg brace/ splint on
  • is my stick near by
  • what else do I need to do while I am up so i can limit the pain that is induced by moving

Mentally having to think about everything you do it tiring. Small things like going for a walk are exhausting. I have to concentrate so hard paying attention to what the ground it like I am walking on, where I am putting my foot and if there is a handrail or something else to hold on to while going up or down a slope or stairs.

I know I need to be really thankful I am alive and able to be at home etc but it is so hard some days watching the world go by, friends moving up the career ladder, going on wonderful holidays, starting families and I see myself going backwards. I have less and less freedom, reliant on so many people, yet back away from so many people because who wants to be around a 33 year old who cant even look after themselves properly and do the things that every other 33 year olds do.

But I have a lot of things to be positive about and have ideas in the pipeline about how to improve my life, get myself back on track and really do some work to try and get more people to understand asthma and all that goes with it. I never thought asthma could do what it does. It is all the secondary impacts it has on your life that are not spoken about and are not known.

I need to keep finding the positive each day and go to bed knowing I have done something productive with my day even if I have not gone outside or interacted with anyone.

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While I breathe I hope.

We need to stop Mepolizumab

Under a month ago I was writing about how I had been a year on mepolizumab. The drug that I thought was going to be my wonder drug and make my asthma easy to control or so I thought. You can read the post here.

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Part of me wonders did I know deep down that I would be stopping this treatment? I know in my last clinic I had asked my consultant if he thought I was benefiting from getting the drug. He outlined why he thought it was worth staying on it so we agreed I would stay on.

In just a few short weeks after that clinic and chat the words came out my consultants mouth that I didnt want to hear. He said “we are going to stop the mepolizumab treatment because I was not getting the results he wants and while on it I have had some of my most severe attacks”. He felt he could not justify me staying on it as I was still struggling so much and my attacks were getting worse again. He is also concerned about all the other issues I am having with my body which he cant say are due to the mepolizumab but equally he cant say they are not. He is worried about the unknown side effects from the drug due to it being so new.

To say I am gutted is an under statement. It was meant to be my wonder drug. It wasn’t as much as I try to convince myself it was working I cant be sure. It did reduce my eosinophil count which is the only result we can see conclusively that changed once starting it. Otherwise the things like recovering from attacks and bouncing back from colds quicker I cant say are due to the mepolizumab or if they are due to not working in the hospital. I cant say either way. I wish I could say it was due to the mepolizumab but I cant.

So what now??

This was the first question I asked my consultant as once again I feel like I am in a constant state of limbo, reliant on oral corticosteroids which have the be reduced but any reduction exacerbates my asthma again so I will be searching for that drug which can offer me stability. If only prednisolone did not have such awful side effects and you could stay on them with no worries- that would be magic!!

The good news is that there are new biologic treatments out there. There is Fasenra (benralizumab) which I doubt I will be eligible for. I am excited about the results people have been getting from Dupixent (dupilumab). In the UK dupixent is currently only allowed to be used in patients with skin conditions but over in the States there has been a lot of success for people with aspirin sensitive asthma. I hope that perhaps dupixent might be approved for use in asthma because I think the main issue which makes asthma control so hard to achieve is being anaphylactic to salicylic acid- a compound of aspirin which naturally occurs in just about everything.

Until then I just need to sit tight, do the best I can to keep my body as healthy as possible, minimising the risk of attacks and focus on getting better and have a positive mental attitude.

The gift that keeps on giving!!

Many on long term oral prednisolone will be familiar with the saying that it is the gift that keeps on giving. It is the one medication that gives those who are taking it life but also results in many secondary conditions resulting due to the side effects and the prolonged side effects.

I have written before that I have a love hate relationship with oral steroids. My lungs need them but the rest of my body certainly does not. Recently I have felt that the prednisolone just keeps on hitting me in the face with one thing after another from destroying my adrenal gland meaning unless there is a miracle I will never get off steroids, my bones have been leached of all their goodness and now have osteoporosis, my pancreas is affected meaning I have constantly high blood sugar levels, I have had issues with my eyes as well but never to the extent I do now.

For a good number of years now I have had swollen optic nerves. This has not caused me too much bother other than some pretty bad headaches, these headaches have been getting worse and more often to the point a few weeks ago it floored me. I was in bed the entire day, feeling sick and being sick. I have not had a migraine before but thee headaches are what I imagine they are like.

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I went to my optician last October- I was early for my annual check but I kept getting blurred vision at night and the feeling of having a film over my eyes which no matter how much I rubbed them or put moisturising drops still did not ease the discomfort. At this appointment we discovered I was missing a large chunk of my peripheral vision. I did the visual field test a number of times but each time I kept missing a full 1/4 of the circle in my left eye. Obviously this is not normal so I was referred on to the eye hospital with the final consultant visit the other day. I have been having a variety of scans, tests and drops put in my eyes to try and establish what is going on and the appointment was going to be the reveal all and I was hoping it would be an easy fix and also (clutching at straws a little) it would be something other than an effect from the prednisolone.

Anyway I saw the consultant who needs to speak to another consultant because she doesn’t really know what it is that is wrong but there is something seriously wrong. This did not fill be with hope. You go to the consultant because they know these things and can tell you what is wrong but its more waiting for just now while she speaks to her colleague, she is also wanting me to have a head MRI so they can get a better view of things but Im not really sure how that will help them as I don’t think it will show them anything in more details than they already have but maybe it will.

The long and short of it is I have swollen optic nerves but also the outside of the optic nerve is being compressed so the middle of it is bulging out and there is fluid accumulating with it. They don’t know why or how. They are not convinced it is related to my brain as the headaches I get are not consistent with raised intercrainial pressure which is reassuring. So its back to the waiting game.

Oral Steroids and Bone Health

Oral steroids like prednisolone come with a vast array of side effects. Some of these side effects can be very visible such as weight gain, or thinning skin but these are not the side effects to be worried about. It is the silent side effects that we don’t see that need to most attention and care. As well as steroid induced diabetes and high blood sugar levels one of the other potentially catastrophic side effects from prednisolone and other oral steroids is bone thinning and osteoporosis.

Over the many years of taking oral prednisolone I have gone from someone who really did not think about the side effects to being hit full force in the face.

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I have been prescribed bone protection for years. Calci-chew D3 Forte twice a day and then alendrotnic acid once a week. I have to be honest and until maybe 5 years ago I was not the most compliant at taking my bone protection. The calci-chew never bothered me and it was easy to take but it was the alendronate I used to always forget. I think it is because you only take it once a week and when you take it you must take it with a full glass of water, be sitting up and not take any other medication with it. Part of my morning routine I do on auto pilot which included taking my medication. I would just take it, and do my teeth etc without thinking. Often by the time I realised I was meant to take my alendronate I would be half way through my breakfast. I was not missing it on purpose but after several experiences of taking it after eating I was not going to do it again in a hurry.

A good consultant will make sure you get a DEXA scan regularly especially if you are on long term oral steroids. I had not had one at all until maybe 5 years ago when I was sent for one to check my bone health. The results were shocking. I had early stage osteoporosis with significant bone density loss. I was at this point not even 30 and had the bones of an old lady. I also knew at this point that my asthma was not likely to get much better and I would be on oral steroids for a good portion of my life so I needed to wake up and make an extra effort to take my alendronate. Which I did.

The one slightly daunting part of the whole thing was filling in the pre DEXA scan questionnaire particularly the bit about you diet where it asks how much milk you drink and how much daily you have. I had to count up the average amount of milk over a week and I was pretty shocked!!! But I guess when it comes to bone health the more calcium the better!!

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Now it is the anxious wait for the results to be processed and sent back to my consultant. No matter what the result is there is not much more I could have done. Since finding out I had the early stages of osteoporosis I have been religious in taking my bone protection medication which is all I can ask for.

I do wonder that is the reason I have osteoporosis now because I was started on bone protection late but also because once started I never really took it as thought I didnt need it as I was young and my bones would be ok. I can’t dwell on it now because it has happened and I cant change things. I can only now stop things from getting worse rather than hoping to cure my bones.

If anyone reading this is on oral steroids and not taking calcium supplements from your GP, Asthma Nurse or Asthma consultant then please ask for them. Steroids can have an awful effect on your bones. One friend is now wheelchair bound due to the adverse effects of steroids on her bones.

Never underestimate the power of the humble oral steroid. They do some wonderful things and as a result mean many are alive but they do have some side effects which can be equally as devastating as not taking the drug themselves in the first place.

It’s ok to not be ok.

This past week has been really tough. Asthma is one of those conditions that is on a spectrum. Going from those with the mildest of asthma to those with the most severe and life threatening asthma you get everyone across the board and you can not pick out the one person with mild and the one person with severe asthma. You can’t see asthma, sometimes you can hear it depending on how wheezy you are!!!

Recovery from this last hiccup has taken a lot longer than I ever anticipated. It was not the worst of attacks but equally was not the mildest either. I was only in hospital for a week yet it has taken me a good 3 weeks to get back on my feet and still Im not there yet.

I have been so fortunate this time to have the support of my consultant. When I say support I mean that should I have issues he has said so many times that I just need to call his secretary and she will get him to call me back or the resp reg on call to give me a call. Having that support is so reassuring to me it makes life that little bit easier. Also being seen in clinic every month (which is a faff but won’t be forever) and then on top of that I am at the ward once a month too for my mepolizumab injection with the asthma nurse specialists so if I have any issues I can ask them too.

As much support as there is they cannot speed up the recovery process and help with the everyday symptoms that just take time. The never ending fatigue that no matter how much you rest it just doesn’t go away (Thanks to prednisolone contributing to that), and no it doesn’t help by getting a good night sleep. It is a fatigue that is unlike no other- a fatigue that having a nap won’t fix, it is a feeling where your whole body feels double its weight, you are not tired and sleeping doesn’t help, but you just cant do anything. Until you have experienced it (which I hope you won’t) you have no idea what it is like. This is the really hard bit. Fatigue you cant see, and asthma you cant see.

Keeping your mind motivated is really hard when your body is preventing you from doing what you love. This is the challenge I keep facing. This time of year its all about Christmas, Christmas Parties, going out with friends, shopping and enjoying the festive period, but I feel like I am sitting watching the world go by and seeing photos of people enjoying themselves but I haven’t been able to join them. Just going to the shops to get the messages is hard enough leaving me exhausted.

One big thing that I am really finding hard and one friend who is also on biologic therapy said this can be a side effect is speed of recovery as well as joint and muscle weakness. Speed of recovery has been slow but as I keep trying to tell myself slow and steady wins the race- but truthfully its getting really wearing now. The other thing is the joint and muscles weakness. I always have some weakness after being in hospital as for most of it I am bed bound and not able to get up due to the inability to breath and also the number of IV lines I have which are often in my feet making walking a challenge. Building up slowly isn’t helping. The only way I can describe it is having DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) but having DOMS that won’t go away. Normally lasting 48 hours this has been 2 weeks now and my quads feel like they are ripping in half every time I go to sit down or stand up, occasionally jerking as I walk too, stairs are an interesting experience- thankfully I have a lift in my building so can avoid the stairs!!!

I am desperate to get back to work and my consultant knows this. I see him tomorrow to hopefully get the ok. I know it will be tough going back to work but I need something to mentally challenge me. I having been doing bits and pieces of research and evaluation of research conferences too. Evaluation forms I find are so hit or miss especially when there has been positive or negative things that you want to acknowledge etc- there is never the room and I end up putting a covering letter along with the form.

This whole recovery process and hospital admission this time has taught me a lot. The main thing I guess I have finally accepted is that it is ok to not be ok. It is ok to ask for help and admit when you are defeated. Over the years I have been made to see a psychologist to help me deal with life with severe asthma. You could say I was a bit resistant to it initially. I think it was the stigma I associated with it. I felt that if I was seeing a psychologist then something was wrong with me mentally and actually my problems were psychological rather than physical. I think I made this assumption because I was young (this was over 12 years ago) and at the time there was really not much openness about mental health and it really was stigmatised. In more recent years as my asthma has impacted my life in ways I never thought it would and prevented me doing more than I ever thought I have been so thankfully to have access to a psychologist  who I can see regularly and help deal with the restrictive aspects of living with such severe asthma. What I have found though is that I have focused so much on adapting life to cope with my asthma and the majority has been on pacing. I didn’t realise that a major area which we never worked on or spoke about was the severe life threatening attack that comes out the blue much like this last one was, and also the trauma after it. It has almost felt like a mild version of post traumatic stress because even at clinic last week I got this huge sense of fear when I saw those windows of the ICU again.

So tomorrow I have a variety of different appointments all at different hospitals. The morning I have the asthma nurse specialists for my mepolizumab injection and review with my consultant, then the eye pavilion to have tests done on my eye that has lost its peripheral vision and then over to the royal infirmary to see the psychologist and will go up to see work and discuss coming back.

I hope that getting back to work and routine will maybe improve the fatigue I have and give me a purpose to my day again.