We need to stop Mepolizumab

Under a month ago I was writing about how I had been a year on mepolizumab. The drug that I thought was going to be my wonder drug and make my asthma easy to control or so I thought. You can read the post here.

IMG_4568

Part of me wonders did I know deep down that I would be stopping this treatment? I know in my last clinic I had asked my consultant if he thought I was benefiting from getting the drug. He outlined why he thought it was worth staying on it so we agreed I would stay on.

In just a few short weeks after that clinic and chat the words came out my consultants mouth that I didnt want to hear. He said “we are going to stop the mepolizumab treatment because I was not getting the results he wants and while on it I have had some of my most severe attacks”. He felt he could not justify me staying on it as I was still struggling so much and my attacks were getting worse again. He is also concerned about all the other issues I am having with my body which he cant say are due to the mepolizumab but equally he cant say they are not. He is worried about the unknown side effects from the drug due to it being so new.

To say I am gutted is an under statement. It was meant to be my wonder drug. It wasn’t as much as I try to convince myself it was working I cant be sure. It did reduce my eosinophil count which is the only result we can see conclusively that changed once starting it. Otherwise the things like recovering from attacks and bouncing back from colds quicker I cant say are due to the mepolizumab or if they are due to not working in the hospital. I cant say either way. I wish I could say it was due to the mepolizumab but I cant.

So what now??

This was the first question I asked my consultant as once again I feel like I am in a constant state of limbo, reliant on oral corticosteroids which have the be reduced but any reduction exacerbates my asthma again so I will be searching for that drug which can offer me stability. If only prednisolone did not have such awful side effects and you could stay on them with no worries- that would be magic!!

The good news is that there are new biologic treatments out there. There is Fasenra (benralizumab) which I doubt I will be eligible for. I am excited about the results people have been getting from Dupixent (dupilumab). In the UK dupixent is currently only allowed to be used in patients with skin conditions but over in the States there has been a lot of success for people with aspirin sensitive asthma. I hope that perhaps dupixent might be approved for use in asthma because I think the main issue which makes asthma control so hard to achieve is being anaphylactic to salicylic acid- a compound of aspirin which naturally occurs in just about everything.

Until then I just need to sit tight, do the best I can to keep my body as healthy as possible, minimising the risk of attacks and focus on getting better and have a positive mental attitude.

SMC approves Benralizumab (Fasenra)

Today was a big day for many Scottish people living with severe asthma. Many of us live day to day taking medications that do not fully help relieve our asthma symptoms and keep our asthma under control. It can be very frustrating and scary to live day to day not knowing how you will be.

fullsizeoutput_313b

In the UK medication approval is not universal. England and Scotland have different groups which approve or reject medications which could become part of the NHS formulary making it available to patients.

England have NICE- the National Institute of Clinical Excellence. NICE approved Fasenra earlier this year meaning it was available to patients who fit the criteria for it. However in Scotland we had a longer wait meaning many with severe asthma have been able to see the positive effects this drug has had on people in England knowing that they are not guaranteed it because the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has to approve it. The last monoclonal antibody Reslizumab was approved by NICE but rejected by the SMC so many were waiting with baited breath today to see what the SMC would do.

It was a huge relief today when I got a phonemail from Asthma UK to say it has been approved. This means there is one more drug out there for those with severe asthma to try and hope that it will be their wonder drug. The weird thing with monoclonal antibody treatments (aka the mabs) is that they work for some and not for others. Just because you qualify for them through your IgE or eosinophil count does not mean that it will make a difference. This leaves many feeling lost and wondering if there will ever be a break for them from living with daily symptoms struggling to breath something no one should ever have to do.

The below is part of the press release from Asthma UK which I contributed to about the impact that severe asthma has had only life and what the approval by the SMC means:

“My severe asthma leaves me gasping for breath, exhausted and unable to even walk down the road. While I’ve had asthma all my life, it worsened as I got older. I had no choice but to take long-term oral steroids at a high dose which has left me with terrible side effects including osteoporosis. I used to be sporty and had my dream job as a nurse but my asthma got so bad I had to give it up. This new drug could transform my life allowing me to get back into work and regain my independence. It’s high time that severe asthma was taken seriously and that everyone who needs this kind of drug is able to get it.”

I was also interviewed for the radio which went out across Global Radio Networks this evening which was also focused on living with severe asthma, the effects medications to date have had on me and what Fasenra could mean for me and many others like me.

I am really proud to have been able to share my story but also that there is light at the end of the tunnel for others. It finally feels like severe asthma is being recognised. It seems that asthma only makes the headlines when a young person dies from an attack which is catastrophic but asthma should not be in the headlines for this, this should not even be occurring but it is. Despite this asthma is not being recognised. Hopefully there will be enough coverage about the approval of Fasenra in Scotland and how many people it may benefit from it that asthma may get taken more seriously and there will be more funding available to help those with severe asthma whose lives are being dictated by a condition that is so misunderstood despite their own and their medical teams best efforts to control it.

For me I had hoped mepolizumab would be my wonder drug. I still hope that it will be but I am not sure. I am still reliant on oral steroids and not able to reduce my maintenance dose, I have had to give up work, have also recently decided to step back from some of my lacrosse commitments all because of my asthma. My best efforts to control it are not enough but there are limited medications available to me that I have not tried which could help me. With each new drug that is approved there is that little bit more hope that one day my asthma will no longer dictate my life and just be a part of my life that does not cause me any problems.