Trauma of ICU

Finally I am able to sit down without getting upset or terrifying myself about my latest hospital admission specifically experience in ICU. The photo below may not look like much and you may think its a window and building but this is what has caused me to much trauma.

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Before anyone reads on please note this is just my feelings from it and my experience. The staff: nurses, support workers, physios and Dr’s were all fantastic and could not do anymore to help me.

This admission has rocked me so much. A lot more than any other has and I hope that I won’t ever get like this again.

There was a series of events I think which led to it all becoming too much once I got back to the ward and I guess basically I just broke down with fear that my asthma will kill me.

The lead up to being admitted was really rapid, as I said in my previous post where I spoke about the admission and how it went broadly speaking. What I didnt speak about was the true mental toll it took on me.

As with any trip to ICU in the back of your mind you know its not good because ICU is the end of the road in terms of hospital care you cant get any more treatment beyond what they an offer. I have been to ICU so many times, I cant even count the number of times I have been admitted there and come out the other end.

Once up in ICU there was the usual battle of trying to get a arterial line in which again failed and we decided to stop short of a cut down thank goodness as this caused me to lose the feeling in my left thumb and part of palm. High flow oxygen running various IV infusions and I had this feeling of being safe. I was in ICU and would be ok. Next came review from the consultant who said if things did settle next step is being intubated and ventilated.  I have had the said to me several times so I didnt think much more about it.

It was not until I came back to the respiratory ward that mentally I really found it tough. After starting to feel much better and access being an issue I was keen to be weaned off some of the infusions I was on. This didnt go to plan and a few hours after I really didnt feel to great so I let them know. Junior drs came to review and were concerned. It was late on in the day and about 7pm my own consultant came round to review me- that in itself freaked me as he was not even on the ward team but he came through. He wanted everything put back to the previous doses, have a whole load of nebulisers and be moved to the high care bay for close observations.

It was the move to the high care bay that brought so much flooding back and I felt that I just couldn’t cope at all. I have been in the high care bay before and never had any issues. I already felt quite on edge because by this point I had been seen by 2 consultants out of hours who came to listen to my chest and see how I was, have all my medications increased again and being moved. The move was what was enough to tip me over the edge. Once moved and settled I looked up and out the window and could see the ICU. The photo from above is below and I have marked where the ICU is.

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The combination of what the consultant said in ICU, and then getting worse on the ward and having consultants review me when they would not normally see you come in to review you and then seeing ICU again and the Dr’s talking about taking you back there was just too much. I think it was also because on the ward I was on the maximum treatment for my chest and just not getting better. The consultant was worried because I had been given 36mg of salbutamol via nebulisers with little effect. Thankfully they kept persevering and my airways did slowly start to open and breathing became easier.

Its fine when you are acutely unwell and everyone is buzzing around you making sure your ok, listening to your chest, giving you nebulisers, doing your observations you dont get much time to think or worry about not being able to breathe. Its once your that bit better and left alone and normally left with the parting words- “rest and try to get some sleep” and the lights go out. That is when it hits you. Still feeling not great and still finding breathing a real challenge sleep is the last thing you are able to do. Its a very strange feeling when you are so exhausted you want to sleep but scared to sleep at the same time. Being in the dark makes everything much worse and I just got so scared. I couldn’t help but break down. I was able to speak to a nurse but they could not offer much as its not like there is a magic pill that makes fear go away and because of my chest not being great they cant give you anything to help you sleep. At night with less staff around at night they don’t have the time to stop and speak to you and make sure your ok. but at that time it was all I wanted. They did then send a nurse practitioner up who was great but even he said that the psychological support at night was awful and as nurses we are not good at dealing with things unless numbers tell us something.

Over the course of that night as my chest came and went some nurses kept coming and saying to me all my numbers were looking better so I am doing ok. I think this is one of the statements I hate more than anything. I don’t care that my numbers may be ok or better I still feel like crap and having good numbers does not help with the crippling fear I am experiencing.

Once morning finally came around I felt really stupid for getting so upset but was able to have a chat with the Dr about it. I knew it was a vicious cycle of being upset, makes my breathing worse, which makes me more upset as I get scared it means going back to ICU but it is so hard to get out of that cycle.

The fear of what happened is still plaguing me. More so than normal. I can rationalise going to ICU and the need for their help but this time is just different and I cant get it all out my head.

I am a week out of hospital now and really feel like I am no further forward than I was day 1 post discharge. Everything feels just as hard. I have no idea why. Part of me wonders is it because of the biologic therapy that is making it harder to recover or has this all taken a much larger toll on me than I expected.

I have clinic next week and I hope to go through everything with my consultant and make sense of it all. I also hope he will have a reason for me feeling so rubbish despite being home from hospital.

I think this whole thing has just highlighted that no matter how many asthma attacks you have, or how many hospital admissions you never know when you will hit breaking point or when you just cant keep fighting.

Passive smoking……what does it mean???

apart from death?

I cannot count the number of posts I have done about smoking, passive smoking, the smoking ban and how it effects my lungs and the lungs of many others like me.

It really hit me the other day after parking my car in the carpark at work and walking the 200m to get into the hospital how many people I had to pass firstly at the pedestrian crossing, then the pavement to get to the narrow walkway to get inside the doors and then the narrow walkway itself and the doors was just like running a gauntlet and taking your life into your hands.

24….thats how many people (patients) I had to pass who were smoking on the short 200m walk. It is sickening to have so many people.

Im not sure those who are smoking really understand just what the effect is on other people as there is no way to liken it to anything else. I can never explain the mental and physical negative effects that it has on me (and Im sure I am not alone in those thoughts).

The fear I have is unreal. I am terrified that this is what may happen AGAIN

Both these photos are from the effects of passive smoke which hit me when I was no expecting it. The first photo was just before going to ICU after spending about 8 hours in resus, getting stable, moved to assessment unit to then get bad and need ICU. The second was taken in ICU after someone smoking below my open window and me having an asthma attack.

The fear of having asthma attacks is like no other. There are theories that you can make someone run up stairs with a close peg on their nose and breathe through a skinny straw to simulate what it is like to not be able to breathe but they can always take the peg off and open their mouth.

In the photos above I was so tired I just wanted to give up and stop fighting but you cant. If you give up you risk being intubated or dying. This is the reality. So many people die from asthma attacks that come from triggers that are out with their control. It feels like you are being punished for something you didnt do. It is more than just the attack itself but the consequences that go with it- being off work, missing holidays, medication that causes side effects, family being so worried about you, family needing to look after you to name a few.

Before the ban on smoking there were visible smoking shelters and it never used to be a risk to just get from your car into a building. I am not saying that everyone used the smoking shelter but a majority did and the risk was greatly reduced which matters so much.

My biggest fear in life is having an asthma attack, so imagine being faced with your biggest fear on a daily basis multiple times. It seriously makes me wonder if working is really worth the risk. I don’t know who to speak to about it. I blogged about it, tweeted about it, spoken to my union and will just about tell anyone who will listen. I love my job but it is getting to the point of weighing up risk and reward especially with being on a new treatment. Can I really justify the expense this new treatment will cost the NHS vs exposing myself to a major trigger everyday and risk attacks which could jeopardise the success of the trial.

Anyone who can suggest or make a difference to the smoking obstacle course I face please let me know (I have tried using other entrances but this is an issue at other ones too). as I am desperate now.

 

2nd dose of Mepolizumab in the bag

Thats the second dose of mepolizumab done and dusted. Now to wait till next month for my next injection next month.

So many people have been asking me how I feel and if the new drug is helping or making a difference, or ask me when I will start noticing the benefits. Its really hard to tell. I am feeling some positive effects from it I think and there have been a few side effects but nothing major.

The most telling sign is that I have noticed my peak flow has been increasing and I have not been in my red zone since the 19th September. That is a full 10 days. It may not seem like a great achievement and many will not agree with me for being excited that I have gone ten days and not dropped my peak flow but the nature of my asthma has meant that my peak flow is all over the place and so has my control been. I must say my asthma control has not been poor through my own choice and I have tried desperately hard to keep it n control. I have not managed to get into my green zone since June but I am happy with that. Better to be stable and sitting in my amber zone stable than jumping up and down with readings all over the place. I think slow and steady is the way to improve….it has after all only taken 14 plus years to get to this point.

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Other than looking at peak flow results and keeping track of how much salbutamol (both nebuliser and inhaler) I am using how do I actually feel? DoI feel different?? It is hard to say. My prednisolone dose has not been reduced and has been kept at the same dose since I was discharged from hospital in April. I am finding it hard to identify if feeling well and pretty stable is because of the steroids or due to the introduction of the mepolizumab. Once I have my 3rd injection I am hoping my consultant sticks with his plan and we can start the slow process of reducing the prednisolone. I am aware I won’t get off it (or may get off it and converted to hydrocortisone due to adrenal failure) but lower will suit me just fine.

Since starting the mepo I have not been to bad with side effects. After the first I had a bad headache the first time but the second dose was not as bad. A bit of a sore head but nothing to major. The one thing I have noticed and I am not sure if it is coincidence or what but I have been waking up in the morning feeling like I am drowning or choking on the amount of phlegm I have on my chest. I have always had a bit of a productive chest- it goes with the territory of having lung disease but this is different. I am still not sleeping super well but I am wondering if that because I am sleeping slightly better and not waking up so much the phlegm is building up rather than me waking having a cough moving all the stuff and then settling back down. I guess the good thing is that all the movement of phlegm means I (fingers crossed) won’t be as susceptible to a chest infection and may notice them quicker as everything is moving so will see the colour changes. Although this is good that I am moving stuff in my chest I find in the morning I am having to do more saline nebulisers and a lot of physio to move it and it has often made me sick because of it. This is a minor price to pay though in terms of side effects.

With this medication as I have said before I won’t see improvements over night but will over time and I think I am starting to see them. The other thing I have noticed and finding it more and more is that people are telling me how well I look and don’t sound as bad which is probably the best part. The past 3 weekends have been jam packed full of different things- mainly lacrosse and by the end of each weekend I have been on my knees longing for my bed but I have managed them. I have managed to spend these weekends on the side lines of a lacrosse field, or in the middle of a lacrosse field coaching  with either Edinburgh Uni or Scotland (Scotland is just goalkeepers and assistant manager). A lie in over a weekend would be lovely and in the past weekends have been all about recovering and getting myself prepared for the next week of work but I have been able to use these weekends to do what I love and not suffer at work. Don’t get me wrong it was so hard to get up on Monday but I think most people find it hard to get up on a Monday morning for work so being what I called “normal” person tired is awesome.

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One thing I am very thankful for is having people around me who can keep me grounded and don’t let me get ahead of myself. I have always been someone who will try and do the long distance run before I can jog let alone walk so even though I may get grumpy at people holding me back I do appreciate it. Coach Dave at Scotland Lacrosse knows when to reign me in and make sure I just take it easy and ensures I just walk or rest when I perhaps am going full steam.

I have an excitement in my life just now something that I have not had in a long time. I look forward to being able to plan things in advance and not worry that I may need to cancel or not be well enough to attend. I am aware that there will still be times when my lungs just stop me from doing what I want but through this I have also learnt to appreciate life, not take it for granted and just live for the moment.

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New horizons- not knowing how to feel!

In March/April for me my asthma care hit a wall and I could no longer continue as I  was. Despite my consultant being one of the best in the field of difficult to control asthma I was getting no where, I was feeling lost, totally out of control and no idea what I was doing other than trying to keep myself as well as possible. Something had to change and in my opinion it could only be change for the good because I felt things couldn’t get much worse.

That hospital admission changed everything back in April time. By the time I was discharged I had a new team and although I had not met with them yet I felt more confident about my care, who was looking after me and positive about the future. Once discharged home I eagerly awaited my outpatient clinic appointment to find out what would be happening and where I would be going with my care. It took a while to come but yesterday I had my clinic appointment. I spoke with my new consultant on the phone and discussed various things including monoclonal antibody treatment which the allergy people were also keen on. It was decided I would wait and see the consultant once a decision was made on it.

I pinned a lot on yesterdays appointment and the new treatment I would be starting. I kept trying to tell myself to not put all my eggs in this basket as things may not change at all and I might yet end up the same as I am and no further forward in getting my asthma under control. Recently I have felt well and managing my asthma quite well. It is because of the high dose of oral steroids I am on and using nebulisers fairly regularly but it has kept me well. People have commented on how well I look and sound. Again the security blanket of prednisolone the drug we all love to hate but right now I am loving it because I feel so well (come 3am when I am up with insomnia and restless legs I am not so fond of it but cant win them all).

So what happened yesterday….

Well not what I wanted but despite this it was a positive appointment. We did not start new treatment. 2 reasons- my chest was not quite good enough. The recent weather has caused a bit of havoc and I have found it more difficult to remain stable but also he wants to use a different drug but the same type of medication.

He is hopeful that my asthma will get better. He did say and many consultants have said it before I will never be free of asthma and may still need hospital help but I should not have to rely on steroids like I am to be able to function and live some sort of life. I long to just be able to plan things and know where I am with my health from week to week or day to day.

Having faith in a tea is so important and to feel listened to. I went with a list of questions and things I wanted more information on such as a plan of what to do when I am not well because being on unlicensed doses of inhalers and oral steroids there is no where to go when things get bad other than the hospital and that is not needed just for extra medication so to have a plan for this at home would be really helpful.

It may not be perfect but I feel more confident in having someone who I can speak to, I almost ended up crying when I was there as I am so frustrated at my asthma and everything it has cost me and stopped me doing. I try to find the positive and focus on the positives things I have done as a result of asthma but there is the still wonder of what would life be like if my health was to become stable.

I was really shocked when after my appointment I felt so drained and then in the middle of the night I woke up and was so angry. I think it sunk in that there is going to be a change. It may or may not work but something is being tried and nothing has been tried in as long as I can remember. I felt so angry that I have been left sitting for years just going in and out of hospital, up and down on steroids and nothing more was being done so had resigned myself to the forever of life being like that until the attack came that would finish it all. I was angry that only because of a bad admission and really throwing my toys out the pram that something has changed and may help. Im not sure how I will feel about the last decade if this new treatment has a positive effect.

Life has been very busy with various things particularly research and PPI which I love and so thankful to have it to fall on when I asthma is stopping me from doing everything else in my life!!!

The Intensive Care Unit

I have written often about being admitted to intensive care or the high dependancy unit or being reviewed by critical care staff and it always something I have just sort of dealt with and not thought to much more about it. That was until last night. I couldn’t sleep for tossing and turning thinking about how many times I have been in ICU or HDU or had the threat of going there.

Why all of a sudden has it bothered me??

Yesterday was the first meeting of the Critical Care Patient and Public Involvement Group (which I will write more about in a post of its own). A room full of patients who have been in ICU or their relatives, Drs and Nurses from ICU and then researchers whose area is critical care.

Naturally when you have a group of patients together you are naturally going to ask how you are linked with the group and I guess what your story is. In the discussion part of it there were 2 other patients who spoke of their experience being in ICU and how it was awful, the worst time of their life and how the Drs and nurses saved their life because their life was in their hands. It was a traumatic experience for them and they have got through it. I heard the saying “surviving ICU” a lot.

“Surviving ICU” was what bothered me and kept me awake. I think maybe I under estimate how bad my asthma is or maybe how sick I get or how dependent on medical staff I am to get me better. I know that my asthma is severe and I know there are many more hospital admissions, HDU admissions or ITU admissions ahead of me and I think i sort of accepted this maybe. It was not until that group discussion that I realised just how traumatic it is, life threatening it is, and how it is not run of the mill to go in and out of critical care. At the time I was able to keep my emotions in check but when I got home and set up my nebulisers that it really hit me. The other people in the group had a one off experience, this is what ICU is meant to be like ideally a never experience but if it is going to happen then once is more than enough not once or twice a year sometimes more.

In my working life you hear about people going to intensive care, its not looking good for them or statements that you mainly go out ICU horizontally not vertically. I think for me I have always come out of ICU so would never dwell on the experience of being admitted. I cant say it is a pleasant experience not being able to breath and having the most toxic drugs that make you feel horrendous to make you better but it gets better, I go to the resp ward recover and get back home. It is how it goes and has been for the last 14 odd years.

So after that meeting and hearing others speak about ICU it has almost given me a fear. In the back of my mind I know there are only so many times you go to intensive care or high dependancy and get out but so far I always get out and sometimes bounce back but then get out again. I think it is the emotions that I could see on the other patients faces when they recalled their experiences that it hit me that maybe I don’t have the right emotion to it. The fear they had and the gratitude to the Drs for saving their life was clear to see. Its not that I don’t appreciate what the Drs do but I guess I just never wanted to admit that Im going to intensive care because its the safest place and I might just be that unwell that action needs to happen quickly. Every attack I have I am terrified that it might kill me and that asthma may just win the battle and Im sure I have surpassed that thought as it is very over dramatic and im young so it won’t happen but seeing younger patients have that fear of death and the unknown.

I have never really expressed my fears of my asthma to those close to me. I try to give the outward opinion that its fine, its life, its been long enough now I should be used to it. I would like to be able to have a conversation with people about asthma and death but would worry they think I am just being over dramatic and its never going to happen. Maybe I should though as a comment  that occurred really hit me and made me think about how those close to me feel and thought about my asthma and health. Recently a very close friend died, my mum was away, I was home but she read a text out loud and said “oh my god she’s died”. My step dad thought it was me that had died not the friend. This really hit me that if they hear something about someone dying they go to me and think it is me. I try so hard to keep well and take my medications etc but its still not good enough. I always knew they worried about me doing to hospital but never thought about the dying aspect of it.

What I find so difficult and I think it includes the whole critical care thing is that in the past I have been rogue with managing my asthma. I was young and didnt understand it and didnt want to accept it so I would increase medication so I could do something only to crash and burn and end up in hospital. That changed after a consultant had a go at me (they were just stern and didnt mess about but i felt awful so took it worse than had I been well) which I well and truly deserved but I stopped messing about and accepted not being well and accepted what I could and couldn’t do. The point I found so hard was that despite this change in behaviour and management I was still ending up in ICU or HDU but not having the good bit beforehand which I had before. To this day I still really cant accept the ICU or HDU admission for nothing. I get it if I was to go and play a game of football have a bad asthma attack and need critical care- I deserved it, I did something my body cant handle but now I try my best and still end up going there and that is the hard bit. Where before if I hadn’t been doing anything attacks would mean hospital and a respiratory ward where now it is resus, critical care and then respiratory ward. With this development what happens when it gets worse……

Lots to think about.

Asthma Rule 1: ALWAYS have your reliever with you.

On twitter recently you may have seen that I had a small rant about something that happened the other day and I am still reeling over it. I think what got me most is that how are we ever going to change attitudes towards asthma if those with asthma are so cavalier about it.

I was at a Design Informatics Collider with a variety of industry partners, researchers, clinicians, researchers and patients. The theme of the event was ‘Design Support for Asthma’ and what can be done to help asthmatics or those who care for asthmatics which in turn would help asthmatics. There was a group of us patients there from the patient an public involvement group at the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research. I have met most of the patients before who were there and as always it is great to meet new people in the group too.

So what happened??

One of the patients there was chatting about their asthma and their asthma control but then announced and announced proudly that they had not brought a reliever inhaler with them for the trip (baring in mind they came up by train and stayed overnight). They had their preventer inhaler but stated that their asthma was so well controlled that they knew they would not need their reliever. I was gobsmacked by this, and even quite angry about it especially the pride that the statement was delivered with.

Asthma is such a dangerous condition and there has been so much in the press recently about how many people die from asthma, how under funded asthma research is and just generally how bad the asthma situation is. The national review of asthma deaths (NRAD) which was published 2014 highlighted just how dangerous asthma is and how it is those with relatively mild asthma that are at the biggest risk from death and this year the news broke that rather than there being an improvement in the asthma death rate it has in fact got 20% worse not better.

I feel really passionately that even if you are so confident in your asthma and asthma control as an asthmatic you should never leave without a reliever inhaler especially if you are away overnight. For me my inhaler is my security blanket. I always have a ventolin (reliever) in my pocket, even when in hospital and on oxygen and nebulisers I still have my ventolin in my pocket too!! Asthma is such a fickle disease and you never know when a trigger is going to cause your airways to react and tighten up. The reason that was given for not having a reliever with them was that the weather was ok and they would not be affected by any triggers despite saying in the next breath last time they were up they had to climb stairs and were in a really bad way after this- there was no guarantee that there would be no stairs this time round.

I think the main thing that got me was that being involved in AUKCAR and being a member of the PPI group you would think that those in the group are those who are proactive about their condition, wanting to set a good example and manage their condition to the best of their ability. To do this one of the key things is to have all your medications with you. It may end up that you don’t need it, but its better having it all with you and not require it then need your reliever and not have it. Asthma and our airways don’t stop and think that they better not tighten up and become symptomatic because your don’t have your inhaler. They are going to do what they want when they want.

I am still reeling over it and so glad that there were no members of the children and young persons group there because they are impressionable and may think that because someone older than them is not carrying their reliever with them so they don’t need to either. I feel really passionately that if you are part of a group and forward facing attending groups where there are a mix of different professions who are putting a lot of time, dedication and effort into a career of helping those with asthma then you need to be acting in a responsible manner and not bragging that you don’t carry a reliever inhaler because what researchers or clinicians are going to want to help asthmatics when those they are consulting with are not being sensible and taking their condition seriously.

Sick leave- what do you do??

Being on sick leave seems to be an all too common occurrence for me. It is never just a day either its weeks and weeks which feels like months and months (well sometimes it is months).

Often people say to me they would love to be off for as long as I have been off and it must have been nice. I hate saying its not and Im glad to be back but it is the truth. I hate being off as I do love my job. I think when you are at work and having a really hard, difficult day the idea of being off is just great, and then when you have had a week of annual leave that has gone by in just a flash you long for more time off to have a good recharge so when someone is off for a extended time you think it would be bliss but to me it is far from that.

Time stands still, it feels like it moves backwards, hours drag and minutes feel like hours. It is ok when I am in hospital and unwell because you feel so awful- time stands still in a different manner, you want time to speed up so you will be out the attack and find it easier to breathe but it doesn’t speed up, again it takes forever but once out the initial terrifying difficulty to breathe has passed you are left feeling exhausted and time just passes as you dose on and off requiring medication in-between but time just passes in a haze so you really have no idea about time or what day it is. This bit is ok as you really do feel ill and just curl up.

With asthma the tricky bit is when you feel better but you feel better when doing nothing and I mean doing nothing. Lying on a bed you are totally fine, breathing is good, heart rate is comfy, pain is at a low and all seems ok with the world until you need the toilet, shower, something to drink and thats it. Your lungs tighten up, heart rate sky rockets and pain rips through your lungs and you think to yourself all you did was stand up and take a few steps but feel like you have just run a marathon. This is when time is at an ultimate go slow. There is only so much lying on your bed or sitting on the sofa you can do. There is only so much day time TV or on demand TV and films you can watch.

They say rest is good for you, enforced rest is even better for you but even harder especially when you know that any movement you do will cause you to feel pain and go backwards. It is frustrating and difficult. Many of my friends with asthma and other lung diseases know exactly what it is like and share my frustrations. For me it makes getting back to work difficult because doing nothing you feel invincible but when do you know that you are ok to go back to work?? It is a hard call and loving work means you want to go back as soon as possible.

I find my self very fortunate as I have my patient and public involvement stuff which I can occupy myself with when having to be inactive and resting. It keeps my brain really active and i feel like I am doing something good with my down time. It is important and it stops me dwelling on what I imagine I should be doing. I would torment myself otherwise. Also writing this blog and the various support groups I am in helps me through it all but I know others don’t have that which is why I am so passionate about PPI because of the impact it has had on me. I am sure I would have long given up the prospect of even returning to work or do anything had I not had a such positive experience being involved in research. It has made the time that stands still move on and passes and soon it is the day to return to work.

How do I know when I am ready to go back to work properly and actually ready rather than my brain is super bored and I need to do something? This time it has taken me longer to go back to work which Im not ecstatic about however over the past week I have noticed how many people say how much better I am looking and how my breathing appears and sounds. This is the first time in a very long time that people have said positive things about how I look or appear compared with how I look like death warmed up and sound like I have swallowed a whistle. It think this is down to a combination of things, 1 having a better steroid regime which is preventing the dip I kept having late on in the day, 2 switching medical team to a new consultant, asthma nurse etc and having confidence in this team and knowing that things are getting looked into compared to before, and lastly I have been off longer but then I was kept longer in hospital and was reliant on less nebulisers when I was discharged than when I am admitted to the Royal and get discharged often before I can even walk the length of the room and often just bounce back in meaning I am not great and more stress on my body. So there is a number of different factors this time that have changed.

The last few days have been a great test for me to see how I really am doing. Going in to work to help with registrar peritoneal dialysis teaching which I really enjoyed and felt like I was useful. I must say I do love teaching but not just the teaching about something but instilling in the teaching and training how important the patient is and not just to get them better but respecting their choice and understanding what is important to them. I feel in renal this sometimes can be over looked especially when a patient chooses peritoneal dialysis as the work up can be longer and if they suddenly decline and require dialysis without a second thought a temporary line is stuck in them and then thats them on haemodialysis.

Today was also another great check to see how the lungs were doing. I attended a collider to discuss ‘Decision Support for Asthma’ which was industry partners, researchers, clinicians as well as patients to brain storm ways to help those with asthma. It was a fascinating meeting and what was clear was the passion of all those that attended to help people with asthma. Ideas were not the same in the groups but the patient and patient choice was at the centre. As a patient it was great to share what is useful and what is not useful to living with asthma. I will write a different post about this as I hope it will have positive outcomes and lead to new innovations.  I was tired by the end of the day but a good tired and not too chesty either despite the really hot weather and humidity (which I think will only get worse as the weekend goes on!!).

 

So fingers crossed when I see the GP on Wednesday she gives me the thumbs up to go back to work and some normality can return to my life!!!