Asthma in the news

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Asthma has been in the news a lot recently, most of this has been reports on how awful the asthma care is for those with asthma in the UK.

It is not all negative and there has been the odd positive bit of reporting such as new drugs being developed or gaining approval for use from NICE or the Scottish Medicines Consortium.

Most written reports both negative and positive have one common theme which is the use of pictures. These pictures are not promoting good inhaler technique as there is a lack of spacer which is recommended in guidelines produced for asthma management. For anybody no matter how young or old when using a MDI (metered dose inhaler) inhaler also known as a puffer should be using a spacer device to ensure the medication in the inhaler gets into the airways and work where it is needed. Using an MDI without a spacer will often result in the medication being left on your tongue or the back of your throat and not in your lungs. The spacer will prevent this.

Asthma is so misunderstood as a condition. It is essential that media outlets use images which are in date and reflect the current recommendations made by SIGN, BTS or NICE who are the tasked with developing pathways for asthma management. The media using images which reflect correct technique won’t drastically improve the horrendous asthma statistics in the UK but it will make people more aware of the use of a spacer along with their inhaler rather than the inhaler on its own.

Small changes like this can help influence bigger changes in the future. If inhaler technique is correct then the lungs are getting the treatment they require to prevent the asthma from flaring up and therefore will in turn reduce asthma exacerbations, hospital admissions and even asthma death.

Please share this post as it is vital that the media start using new photographs with people using inhalers as recommended in current guidelines.

Having the support of your GP or Asthma Nurse

Having had asthma basically all my life one thing I have come to realise is the importance of your relationship with your GP or asthma nurse. For many they are the front line for you and your asthma care.

I am so fortunate to have a GP who is really understanding and although she finds my asthma baffling she will listen to me and help me when and where she can. Little things like making sure my medications are prescribed correctly, I get my flu jab etc. They also have various flags on their file on the system- this helps so much.

Many dread the phone call into the GP to try and get an appointment because their chest is not good but you have to get passed the gate keepers- the reception staff!!! Before the flags were on the system I used to have great difficulty trying to explain the importance of being seen promptly because my asthma goes off so quickly. It was a nightmare- I understand why they need to do it as appointments are short for the number of patients that need to be seen but when it is asthma it can be different.

After a bad experience not being able to get an appointment on the day because the reception staff thought it could wait, I ended up in hospital! During my follow up appointment with my GP which because I had been in hospital I was able to arrange via the reception staff, my GP was slightly irritated at me not being seen as it is important and could prevent hospital admissions.

Since that follow up appointment there is a flag which says if I am phoning in about my asthma I am to be seen by either my GP or one of the nurse practitioners who know my chest very well. There is also a flag that if I say I need antibiotics I can have a phone call rather than appointment and a final flag that if I feel I need to go to hospital they are to call the respiratory reg on call and arrange this.

Having these flags has made such a difference and offered a sense of security as I know if my asthma is bad then I will be dealt with urgently. Obviously if I call about something else I would need to wait just like everyone else.

I realise I am very fortunate to have all this set up. I wanted to highlight it so that others can ask their GP surgeries about this to help them manage their asthma better as it is a huge stressor when you asthma is bad and not able to get the help. Something so simple as a flag can make the world of difference.

New drugs, new start?

I haven’t written in ages and I apologise for that but I really did not know what to write and how to write without getting myself angry and upset as I feel the last 8 years have just been a total waste.

I wrote a while back about changing consultant and hospital because I was really finding the relationship I previously had with my consultant was no more and my health was getting worse, I was getting put on more and more drugs and constantly riding a rollercoaster of feeling well and being on high dose steroids to feeling rubbish because my steroids were reduced.

So lots has happened since switching consultant. My first appointment I finally felt someone was going to do something to help. I was put forward by my consultant at their MDT meeting to see if another consultant would agree to me being a candidate for mepolizumab. Due to the cost of the drug you need meet certain criteria and have a second consultant agree to it. Thankfully another consultant agreed and the wheels were in motion for me to start.

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I didnt really know what to expect. Its not like other drugs you get by injection like any sickness or steroids where you notice a difference pretty quickly. This one it can take a few weeks before you notice positive effects from it but Im not sure what I will feel and what the positive effects will be. Will it be the nights are better and I won’t wake up so much needing meds or will my peak flow be increased or able to do more during the day with less symptoms??

Time will tell how it goes. For me because of the steroids I am on they are going to use my maintenance dose of steroid a marker for effect of the mepolizumab so if I can reduce this then we can move forward and continue on the mepolizumab but if I cant reduce them without my chest getting worse then I won’t stay on it and will be back to square one and trying to find something else to help me.

Speaking to the nurse they seem to have had really positive effects and not many people have had to stop. Also the side effects have not been too bad apparently. A bit of a headache and back pain seem to be the most common. My head has been killing me but it is easing off and if that is the only side effect I cant really complain because a headache is the least of my worries as the pain and suffering from my chest over all these years far out weighs a sore head!!!

There is deep seated feeling of anger in me which I need to get over but I just cant shake this feeling of having wasted my time with my old consultant. Everyone told me she was the best but I guess the best is not always what works and it really didn’t for me. I asked so often to try different things anything to try and get some stability even asked to stay on the higher dose of steroid as I knew this was what my lungs were happy with but it was always a no and just had to persevere and would get there. Clearly that didnt work as every attack I ended up in ICU or HDU and so much time off work. If it was not for understanding bosses I would be out a job and have no purpose or aim to try and get myself well. I am really angry that it took a horrible admission to hospital and me essentially getting so upset that I was getting no where and people asking me if I had tried x,y and z and all I could say was no and they look quizzically at me like I am mad because my asthma is so uncontrolled yet I have not even been considered to trial some of the more medications till now.

I need to keep myself grounded though. Even though the results of this drug in others has been fantastic I really don’t want to be disappointed and pin all my hopes on it to then be totally devastated that it doesn’t work or it doesn’t work well enough to justify keeping me on it. Even with the best results there can be from the mepolizumab my lung issues won’t totally be cured as the years of uncontrolled asthma have caused a lot of airway remodelling and scarring which cant be reversed.

Fingers crossed the next three months are full of good things and I can stay on the mepolizumab as I desperately want my life back or even just some of my life back where I don’t have to spend all the time I am not working resting to make sure I am then able to work the next day.

Will keep updating as I go and if I see effects from it.

World Asthma Day

On Tuesday 1st May is was World Asthma Day. I normally do something during the day, or post a video etc raising awareness about asthma, how serious it is, how  critically under funded research into asthma is. This year however I didnt do anything I just wasn’t well enough, my chest was far from good and lacked any ability to concentrate and focus on anything, mainly due to the high doses of prednisilone which leave you with a mind that has been put in a blender and constantly mixing your thoughts up and also due to the lack of sleep again thanks to the prednisilone but also my breathing has been getting worse in the late afternoon, evening and into the night making sleep difficult.

But World Asthma Day 2018 was recognised by Asthma UK with a huge thunderclap on how to deal with asthma attacks which reached far and wide across social media. However there was some very disappointing news also announced which is devastating and really makes you think how, why and when will those in power do something about it.

What Im talking about is the UK’s statistic on asthma deaths.

World Asthma Day 2014 saw the publications of the National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) which showed the devastating numbers of people dying from asthma but also that over 2/3 of those deaths would have been preventable had they received the correct asthma care including having an asthma action plan in place, having regular asthma reviews and also correct inhaler technique. The publication of NRAD was meant to be a turning point in asthma care given the shocking statistics. I remember at the time thinking it was bad and that so many people shouldn’t be dying from asthma so you can imagine my shock, upset, dismay when I woke up to hear that asthma statistics have not got any better in the last 4 years in-fact they have got worse. Asthma deaths are 20% worse than they were 4 years ago making asthma statistics in the UK as the 5th worst across Europe and only one of three countries whose death rate increased rather than decreased. It is really shocking but then I sit and think a bit more about it and am I really surprised? I don’t think I am. I didnt think the rate would have increased as much as it has but if Im honest as a patient I really don’t see any changes that have had a big impact on asthma management, and if there are no changes there then there won’t be much of a change in the statistics.

As a patient who has asthma and does use a variety of NHS services because of my asthma I have not noticed any changes in how asthma is managed and monitored. I know my asthma is not run of the mill asthma and is more complex therefore GP’s and asthma nurses in primary care do not have a lot of input into my care other than my annual asthma review which the asthma nurse does at the GP survey. However the review tends to be me updating them on the new research that is out and what new treatments are available. I am often told that I know my asthma better than anyone so they are going to let me self manage but will be there if I need them. I understand why they do this however as a life long asthmatic and a very difficult to control asthmatic I cannot remember the last time I had my inhaler technique reviewed. I don’t think I am doing it wrong as take my inhaler the same way I always have. I also don’t have a written asthma action plan. I have bugged my (now old) consultant for one because being on maximum doses of inhalers I don’t have room to move should I get a cold or chest infection. Now that I am going to have a different consultant who i hope to have a better relationship with and will work with me rather than against me or just not work with me at all leaving me to do most of my management and hoping for the best (mostly I think i do the right thing!). But this got me thinking, how many other asthmatics like me who are difficult to control are just left to do their own thing because the asthma nurses they see say the same as mine that they are far more knowledgable than they are.

One of the other problems I see often and I think is a potential barrier  to reducing the number of deaths due to asthma is those who have asthma give it the respect it deserves and be sensible with it. Due to the difficulty I have with my asthma and the isolation I feel as a result of it I am in several support groups for asthma, brittle asthma and difficult to control asthma. It is here where you can chat to people who know exactly how you feel, how debilitating it is and the frustration  you feel when you try to do everything right but still your asthma is not behaving.

These groups are a great source of support however there is one very concerning theme which keeps recurring which no doubt is also a factor for so many asthma deaths and this is not getting help early.

I will often see posts made by people saying they have been using whole inhalers in a couple of days, or they are struggling to talk and having an asthma attack and they don’t know what to do. In these groups we do not give any medical advice but would suggest the person concerned follows their asthma action plan to which some would reply saying they don’t have on, or that they go and get seen by a GP or hospital. Again some group members would respond saying the GP does nothing except give them steroids or send them to the hospital. There is also the situation at night when GP practices are closed so you need to phone NHS24 and they will assess if you need to be seen by a Dr. Many people again don’t see the point in going to out of hours because they don’t know you so wouldn’t be able to do much. It really frustrates me when this happens. I can understand that asthma is very tricky to deal with as there are so many different phenotypes so seeing your own GP is preferable but it won’t always happen that way and more than likely it is during the night when you start struggling to breathe.

Now for the last, most serious, and riskiest behaviour that also occurs in these groups which could quite easily cause death. What am I talking about is when people post photos of their oxygen saturations or heart rate accompanied by a comment about how much they are struggling and finding it difficult to talk and don’t know what to do. Again naturally you would offer support and see what they have already taken, followed their action plan and if all this has been done the next step is to go to A&E to be reviewed, have their chest sounded and some treatment if needed to get their chest and asthma back under control. The problem occurs when you have given them some advice and recommendations like they asked for however they don’t take it. Many say that going to A&E is a waste of time because they get told their oxygen saturations are ok and their chest is wheezy but they will be ok. They may be given some nebulisers and prednisilone and allowed home. They see this as a waste of time as some feel they can do everything they are being given in A&E. They don’t see the value of attending as they see it as just getting some medication but actually the Dr or nurses are assessing them to see how much effort they are putting into there breathing and if they are using their accessory muscles to help, they will also have bloods taken which can show if they have any infection and require antibiotics. So it might not seem that much is being done but there is a whole assessment taking place. Then there are another group of severe asthmatics who won’t go to A&E early as they feel they are always up at the hospital being admitted for their asthma or being seen in outpatient clinic so they want to maximise their time at home so will stay there until they are really struggling which is when it gets dangerous as an urgent ambulance is often required and the resus room is on standby for you so you get treated straight away and stabilised before moving to a ward. I don’t think people realise that by staying home longer they are taking a big gamble that they will okish by the time the ambulance arrives and takes  them to the hospital. The longer they leave it the longer and harder it is to get back to baseline and the more medication to help relax the constricted airways. This also means that they will require additional medications to treat the asthma and any infection present plus more medications for the side effects of prednisilone.

By delaying when you decide to go and get help because your asthma has got more difficult is critical because you don’t know how severe the attack may be and if your out with a bad chest you may be exposed to triggers and because your not well your airways are going to be more sensitive.

I guess the message I am trying to get across is that no matter how busy you are in life or how much you feel you spend off work and in the hospital nothing makes up for not having a life which is what will happen if you don’t go and get help early for your asthma.