Just use appropriate pictures!!!

I really can’t believe its been a week since I got back to the UK and Healthevoices is over. I still can’t put into words how I feel about it. It was nothing I could ever imagine and really can’t put it in words. It was truly fantastic.

Before I settle to write about the HealtheVoices experience there is something that was posted recently which has really caused a lot of uproar.

Asthma hits the headlines for all the wrong reasons all the time. Normally it is the number of asthma deaths that are occurring hits the headlines which shockingly is at 3 every day in the UK and 11 in the US everyday. Way way to high for a condition that is fairly common but equally under funded.

One of the reasons given to the poor asthma death rate is poor asthma management and poor inhaler technique. There has been a massive push recently in primary care and secondary care to ensure that patients are taking their inhalers when they need to but not only when they need to we need to make sure they are being taken correctly. Unlike tablets which can only really betaken on way, or injections again which when subcutaneous you can’t go massively wrong however inhalers is a whole new board game. The sheer number of different types of inhalers then the need for multi tasking when taking them as you need to breath in, spray inhaler, then take it and hold your breath. There is not enough time given to assessing the type of inhaler which will be best for the patient and suit their needs. Especially the younger people and again older people due to dexterity issues. Even being young, fit and with it taking an inhaler correctly can be hard.

I like to think my inhaler technique is pretty good. I do and have been told on occasion that my technique specifically using my MDI (the traditional spray) inhaler is not quite right. I was even told at an asthma research meeting by one of the Dr’s there my technique was questionable but he said he let me away with it as I was about to go on stage to speak in front of about 150 people. But it shows that even those who can have good technique can slip when not concentrating 100% on what they are doing.

Asthma nurses, dr’s, patients and researchers on twitter were in uproar after the below photo was posted by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE).

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This picture is a complete 101 on how not to take your inhaler. Everything about it is wrong. Quite rightly everyone has been very annoyed by the main centre of excellence for health in the UK getting a photo so wrong. They have clearly not taken any time over selecting a picture or thought about the impression it is going to have on anyone that sees it.

This is not a new issue. Every week there are photos printed/posted relating to asthma which do not show good inhaler technique or even a technique which is relating to the current guidelines. It seems that everyone has their image bank and go to that, select a nice photo and that’s the one that is used.

I have and I am sure many others have come to the conclusion that the image banks have not been updated and are all out of date and not in keeping with current best practice.

As a result of this I have decided to try and make a change. I want to update these image banks and have a wide range of photos, some of older people using their inhaler, some younger people, a mix of devices as well but the key thing is to have the photos which display the current best practice.

I have been very fortunate to have so many people come forward to help with this so I am keen to get started. I have never done anything like this before but the hope is there will be more photos like the one below and zero photos appearing similar to the above.

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Getting it right for a newly diagnosed asthmatic.

Having a conversation with a friend this evening and I was so shocked to hear about her recent experience being diagnosed with asthma. A prolonged cough, wheezing and breathlessness the GP was unable to get on top of things so she was referred on to the hospital to see what was going on. Lung function was not too bad but a very high exhaled nitric oxide test resulted in a diagnosis of asthma.

My first thought was that it was good as she had been started on a preventer and reliever. I didn’t think to ask anymore questions really. She was finding her chest much easier after using the preventer for a few weeks and had very little need for her reliever.

I had made the assumption that once diagnosed she would be given asthma education, told about what signs and symptoms to look out for, what to do should you feel unwell and above all be shown how to take the inhalers both of which are meter dose inhalers (MDI) or the skoosh down inhaler that most people will think of when they think inhaler.

Anyway tonight after a quick question I discovered how badly the diagnosis and management was done. I realised that no asthma education was done, no inhaler technique and she had to ask for a spacer to use her inhaler with as one was not prescribed in the first place. I was horrified that she had not been shown how to take the inhaler. It is an MDI notoriously the most difficult inhaler to get the correct technique and the correct dose into the lungs!

It is so shocking that still new people are being diagnosed with asthma and not given the correct education or support. I am more than happy for friends and anyone really to ask me questions about asthma but surely it should be the asthma nurses or GP’s that give this information when diagnosing. Asthma is in the press enough just now as the asthma death statistics in the UK seem to be getting worse not better and it is among the mild to moderate asthmatics who are dying and most likely due to one of a few factors:

  1. poor inhaler technique
  2. not regularly taking there inhaler as prescribed
  3. not knowing the signs to look out for and take action when asthma control is deteriorating.

I keep going that the research being done will soon filter down into actual practice and asthma management will change. Time spent at the start can help reduce work load in the long run.

Asthma UK has a variety of different documents that can be downloaded to help asthma management and there is no charge so really there is no excuse for people with asthma to not be given the asthma action plan personalised to their needs.

Basic asthma care is essential is we want to achieve the aim of zero tolerance to asthma attacks.

 

Asthma in the news

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Asthma has been in the news a lot recently, most of this has been reports on how awful the asthma care is for those with asthma in the UK.

It is not all negative and there has been the odd positive bit of reporting such as new drugs being developed or gaining approval for use from NICE or the Scottish Medicines Consortium.

Most written reports both negative and positive have one common theme which is the use of pictures. These pictures are not promoting good inhaler technique as there is a lack of spacer which is recommended in guidelines produced for asthma management. For anybody no matter how young or old when using a MDI (metered dose inhaler) inhaler also known as a puffer should be using a spacer device to ensure the medication in the inhaler gets into the airways and work where it is needed. Using an MDI without a spacer will often result in the medication being left on your tongue or the back of your throat and not in your lungs. The spacer will prevent this.

Asthma is so misunderstood as a condition. It is essential that media outlets use images which are in date and reflect the current recommendations made by SIGN, BTS or NICE who are the tasked with developing pathways for asthma management. The media using images which reflect correct technique won’t drastically improve the horrendous asthma statistics in the UK but it will make people more aware of the use of a spacer along with their inhaler rather than the inhaler on its own.

Small changes like this can help influence bigger changes in the future. If inhaler technique is correct then the lungs are getting the treatment they require to prevent the asthma from flaring up and therefore will in turn reduce asthma exacerbations, hospital admissions and even asthma death.

Please share this post as it is vital that the media start using new photographs with people using inhalers as recommended in current guidelines.