International Nurses Day

The birthday of Florence Nightingale it is only natural that this is also international nurses day given she was the founder of modern nursing as we know it.

When I left school I was the last person anyone would have thought would be a nurse. All I did was sport, all I talked about was sport. I was sport and it was all I had. A series of events happened in life and I had to rethink my career and I somehow ended up doing nursing and I could not be happier!!! I had so much fun doing my training and then got a job in an area I never thought I would end up but being a renal nurse is pretty special and I don’t think any other area you will get the same relationship between nurses, patients, Drs and families.

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This photo was taken just after we passed our final OSCE’s in 3rd year!!!

I miss putting on my cornflower blue uniform everyday. I loved being a nurse and will be back as a nurse when my lungs get better. Being a nurse is hard work, busy, never time for a rest and you never know what will happen next but seeing the improvements in patients is the best feeling you can have. Even if it is the little things like sitting chatting to them or helping them with a wash and getting their own clothes on, it is so rewarding. For me it is even more special as I have been on the receiving end of nursing care so many times and the nurses that take that extra bit of time to just do that little something means so much to me.

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This uniform means so much to so many. For me it gives me a purpose. While not being in renal this year I keep my uniform out so on days when I am feeling dejected and thinking about what I should be doing had my health not stopped me, it is there reminding me what I am aiming to get back to. My life as a nurse is not over, it is temporarily on hold, while I focus on research and getting my health better so I can go back to doing what I love with a body that can cope and the energy to give it my all.

I also owe my life to nurses. Having asthma like I do and requiring hospital treatment, admissions and appointments I come across a lot of nurses. The nurses have made sure I am alright, helped me wash when I am too weak to do it myself, helped me go to the toilet when just moving from the bed to commode is too much for my lungs, even just holding my hand when I am finding the situation terrifying because every breath is a fight and requires more energy than I can muster. The presence of a nurse just being there adds this security so I know I am ok.

When you live with a chronic condition which lands you in hospital fairly often you end up getting to know the staff in the wards. For me it is the respiratory ward. I always end up going to the same one now particularly since moving consultants. I also have to go to the respiratory ward once a month for my mepolizumab injection which is given to me by the asthma nurse specialists who take such care and will always answer questions I have or even just reassure me that I have done the right thing. One draw back which when I am not in hospital it is not a draw back is that the nurses now know me well. They will not hold back when they know I need pushed and just to buck up a bit. They will tell me to stop being stupid or stop being grumpy etc, at the time I hate them for it but I know they are doing it for my own good otherwise I would wallow in self-pity until I snapped myself out of it. Equally those nurses know when I am not doing well and am struggling, because they know me they know when something is up.

In NHS Lothian there is an awards night which celebrates the work of different people across the trust. Not only nurses, but Dr’s auxillaries, domestics anyone. The shortlist has just been released and it was fantastic to see one of the nurses from Ward 54 (the respiratory ward I attend) is up for Nurse of the year. I am thrilled as he is super. I have known him for a number of years, he is always so caring and takes time with his patients even when he has 101 things to do you never feel like you are being rushed, he gives you the time you need. He also always speak to your relatives and takes an interest which is really special. Nurses just now are stretched beyond belief, moral is low and nurses are required to do more and more jobs than before but with this nurse you would never guess. I really hope he does win the nurse of the year as he is so genuine and acts the same way to all his patients.

I want to thank all the nurses who have looked after me and worked with me. If it was not for them I would not be here.

Guest blog post: Why being a Volunteer is Important in healthcare?

And how to keep them happy and feeling valued.

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Hi, My name is Mark Hudson, You probably have no idea who I am, that’s ok I’d be surprised if you did. Olivia and I met in August of 2018 at an ICU steps Edinburgh event, Creativity in ICU recovery, it was my first speaking event. I was nervous as talking about what happened to me in ICU is not easy, it is bearing my soul, several people spoke at me. Note that AT me, an ex ICU consultant who basically telling me about what a patient goes through in recovery, arrogant right? Other spoke at me telling me why they where great, Dr Ramsay introduced herself but was very busy so during the event didn’t have the time to talk (which is fine there was a lot going on). So, who was the first person who actually spoke to me? Who treated me like a person, a person whose view was important? Olivia. I don’t have many friend but I make them fast, with me its all in or all out, I don’t have any middle ground. My health issues and nearly dying in ICU made some things clear to me, life is short and as such you should surround yourself with good people. I chose to surround myself with great people like Olivia.

I have only met Olivia one other time in the real world but I am happy to call her one of my best friends. Why I hear you asking? Because we have fought in the trenches of Critical Illness, we have battled ICU Delirium, we have had to deal with life long health issues and we have both made it through mostly intact. Ok so now to get to the point of the blog, I hear you saying thank god, a bit rude but that ok I forgive you 😉

I was given an opportunity to Volunteer after I completed my ICU rehabilitation clinic I was invited to become the peer support volunteer for the clinic it was a big deal to me as it was an opportunity to pay back for the people who saved my life and help to make those who came after me in ICU’s lives a bit better. A chance to make a real difference in peoples lives, this is the main reason why people volunteer in these types of positions. However, it is very easy to take them for granted, after all they are not paid so they are valued as, less right? Well no because you are being paid to do your job, they are giving up their time and experience. So how do you avoid this pothole, well you do somethings my team did with me, you listen to their input taking it seriously and weighting as equal to the other team members or greater depending on the subject. Also inviting them to any Quality improvement meetings you have and treat them like one of the team as they are not a guest they are very much in your team. Other things like remunerating for their travel is important too as why should they be out of pocket for helping you out.

I have now started doing what I call freelance volunteering inside my health board mainly on Delirium so far. This is where I am brought in to talk say at a conference or training session etc. Now these situations are trickier for the people who are bringing the Volunteers in because unlike my clinic experience, I am not part of the team. However, in this situation I am being brought in as an ‘Expert’ now this can be a problematic area as you are often viewed on as a free resource. No other expert would be looked at in that way, it is as if because you are giving your time up for nothing you lose position you become an almost inferior. This is the worst thing you can do to a volunteer because you will make them feel like a failure and not respected, which will make them much less likely to volunteer with you or anyone else for that matter. So, I hear you asking how to avoid this, its trickier, because there is not usually a pre-existing relationship it can be tricky. Here is my ‘guide’: if you are in a faraway or difficult to get to part of a building meet them at the front door; if there are other speakers or ‘important’ team members introduce them and say they have came to help you do x or have Volunteered to show us X it shows they are important; Introduce them before they speak and thank them when they are done in front of the group it shows their value to the group; and at very very least offer to pay any travel expenses because why should they pay to help you.

Ok so the serious stuff aside it boils down to is remember they are a human being put yourself in their shoes and see how you would want to be treated. Remember they owe you nothing, they do not need to help you, that is sometimes forgot. They do not need to give you their time, insights, wisdom or bear their soul to you. They are giving you a gift, its not yours to take or demand its theirs to give so remember that when you are working with volunteers.

Mark also writes his own blog which is well worth a read. Mark is also an avid poet writing some fantastic poems. I have been very fortunate and Mark has penned a few poems for me which I will post for others to enjoy too!!

Mark’s blog is: https://autoimmunedisorderjourney.blogspot.com

Twitter: @MarkThomHudson

A big thank you from myself and Karen

Myself and Karen (Captain at Craigmillar Park Golf Club) want to thank all those who participated, volunteered, donated prizes, and helped make the day such a great success. A huge amount of money was raised and it was way above our target but the money everyone donated and help raise will go towards ground breaking developments in asthma research to help produce new medications to help everyone with asthma. A thank you to Lisa who introduced our video and her son for his expert filming!

Everyone knows someone with asthma but not everyone knows that 3 people die every day from an asthma attack. Since the publication of the National Review of Asthma Deaths in 2014 there have been approximately 1600 deaths from asthma in the UK. This number is far to high. I owe a huge thanks to all those who have helped save my life when been admitted to hospital and ended up in intensive care or high dependancy but I have ad some friends who have not been so lucky and have lost their life to asthma. The public perspective of asthma needs to change as many think asthma is just about taking a blue inhaler but it is far more than that. I can control and dictate your life in ways you never think are possible. Even those who have mild asthma and will never think they are at risk of a life threatening asthma attack but they are, anyone with an asthma diagnosis could potentially be at risk from asthma.

Please watch our video below.