Just use appropriate pictures!!!

I really can’t believe its been a week since I got back to the UK and Healthevoices is over. I still can’t put into words how I feel about it. It was nothing I could ever imagine and really can’t put it in words. It was truly fantastic.

Before I settle to write about the HealtheVoices experience there is something that was posted recently which has really caused a lot of uproar.

Asthma hits the headlines for all the wrong reasons all the time. Normally it is the number of asthma deaths that are occurring hits the headlines which shockingly is at 3 every day in the UK and 11 in the US everyday. Way way to high for a condition that is fairly common but equally under funded.

One of the reasons given to the poor asthma death rate is poor asthma management and poor inhaler technique. There has been a massive push recently in primary care and secondary care to ensure that patients are taking their inhalers when they need to but not only when they need to we need to make sure they are being taken correctly. Unlike tablets which can only really betaken on way, or injections again which when subcutaneous you can’t go massively wrong however inhalers is a whole new board game. The sheer number of different types of inhalers then the need for multi tasking when taking them as you need to breath in, spray inhaler, then take it and hold your breath. There is not enough time given to assessing the type of inhaler which will be best for the patient and suit their needs. Especially the younger people and again older people due to dexterity issues. Even being young, fit and with it taking an inhaler correctly can be hard.

I like to think my inhaler technique is pretty good. I do and have been told on occasion that my technique specifically using my MDI (the traditional spray) inhaler is not quite right. I was even told at an asthma research meeting by one of the Dr’s there my technique was questionable but he said he let me away with it as I was about to go on stage to speak in front of about 150 people. But it shows that even those who can have good technique can slip when not concentrating 100% on what they are doing.

Asthma nurses, dr’s, patients and researchers on twitter were in uproar after the below photo was posted by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE).

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This picture is a complete 101 on how not to take your inhaler. Everything about it is wrong. Quite rightly everyone has been very annoyed by the main centre of excellence for health in the UK getting a photo so wrong. They have clearly not taken any time over selecting a picture or thought about the impression it is going to have on anyone that sees it.

This is not a new issue. Every week there are photos printed/posted relating to asthma which do not show good inhaler technique or even a technique which is relating to the current guidelines. It seems that everyone has their image bank and go to that, select a nice photo and that’s the one that is used.

I have and I am sure many others have come to the conclusion that the image banks have not been updated and are all out of date and not in keeping with current best practice.

As a result of this I have decided to try and make a change. I want to update these image banks and have a wide range of photos, some of older people using their inhaler, some younger people, a mix of devices as well but the key thing is to have the photos which display the current best practice.

I have been very fortunate to have so many people come forward to help with this so I am keen to get started. I have never done anything like this before but the hope is there will be more photos like the one below and zero photos appearing similar to the above.

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Getting it right for a newly diagnosed asthmatic.

Having a conversation with a friend this evening and I was so shocked to hear about her recent experience being diagnosed with asthma. A prolonged cough, wheezing and breathlessness the GP was unable to get on top of things so she was referred on to the hospital to see what was going on. Lung function was not too bad but a very high exhaled nitric oxide test resulted in a diagnosis of asthma.

My first thought was that it was good as she had been started on a preventer and reliever. I didn’t think to ask anymore questions really. She was finding her chest much easier after using the preventer for a few weeks and had very little need for her reliever.

I had made the assumption that once diagnosed she would be given asthma education, told about what signs and symptoms to look out for, what to do should you feel unwell and above all be shown how to take the inhalers both of which are meter dose inhalers (MDI) or the skoosh down inhaler that most people will think of when they think inhaler.

Anyway tonight after a quick question I discovered how badly the diagnosis and management was done. I realised that no asthma education was done, no inhaler technique and she had to ask for a spacer to use her inhaler with as one was not prescribed in the first place. I was horrified that she had not been shown how to take the inhaler. It is an MDI notoriously the most difficult inhaler to get the correct technique and the correct dose into the lungs!

It is so shocking that still new people are being diagnosed with asthma and not given the correct education or support. I am more than happy for friends and anyone really to ask me questions about asthma but surely it should be the asthma nurses or GP’s that give this information when diagnosing. Asthma is in the press enough just now as the asthma death statistics in the UK seem to be getting worse not better and it is among the mild to moderate asthmatics who are dying and most likely due to one of a few factors:

  1. poor inhaler technique
  2. not regularly taking there inhaler as prescribed
  3. not knowing the signs to look out for and take action when asthma control is deteriorating.

I keep going that the research being done will soon filter down into actual practice and asthma management will change. Time spent at the start can help reduce work load in the long run.

Asthma UK has a variety of different documents that can be downloaded to help asthma management and there is no charge so really there is no excuse for people with asthma to not be given the asthma action plan personalised to their needs.

Basic asthma care is essential is we want to achieve the aim of zero tolerance to asthma attacks.

 

Asthma in the news

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Asthma has been in the news a lot recently, most of this has been reports on how awful the asthma care is for those with asthma in the UK.

It is not all negative and there has been the odd positive bit of reporting such as new drugs being developed or gaining approval for use from NICE or the Scottish Medicines Consortium.

Most written reports both negative and positive have one common theme which is the use of pictures. These pictures are not promoting good inhaler technique as there is a lack of spacer which is recommended in guidelines produced for asthma management. For anybody no matter how young or old when using a MDI (metered dose inhaler) inhaler also known as a puffer should be using a spacer device to ensure the medication in the inhaler gets into the airways and work where it is needed. Using an MDI without a spacer will often result in the medication being left on your tongue or the back of your throat and not in your lungs. The spacer will prevent this.

Asthma is so misunderstood as a condition. It is essential that media outlets use images which are in date and reflect the current recommendations made by SIGN, BTS or NICE who are the tasked with developing pathways for asthma management. The media using images which reflect correct technique won’t drastically improve the horrendous asthma statistics in the UK but it will make people more aware of the use of a spacer along with their inhaler rather than the inhaler on its own.

Small changes like this can help influence bigger changes in the future. If inhaler technique is correct then the lungs are getting the treatment they require to prevent the asthma from flaring up and therefore will in turn reduce asthma exacerbations, hospital admissions and even asthma death.

Please share this post as it is vital that the media start using new photographs with people using inhalers as recommended in current guidelines.

Having the support of your GP or Asthma Nurse

Having had asthma basically all my life one thing I have come to realise is the importance of your relationship with your GP or asthma nurse. For many they are the front line for you and your asthma care.

I am so fortunate to have a GP who is really understanding and although she finds my asthma baffling she will listen to me and help me when and where she can. Little things like making sure my medications are prescribed correctly, I get my flu jab etc. They also have various flags on their file on the system- this helps so much.

Many dread the phone call into the GP to try and get an appointment because their chest is not good but you have to get passed the gate keepers- the reception staff!!! Before the flags were on the system I used to have great difficulty trying to explain the importance of being seen promptly because my asthma goes off so quickly. It was a nightmare- I understand why they need to do it as appointments are short for the number of patients that need to be seen but when it is asthma it can be different.

After a bad experience not being able to get an appointment on the day because the reception staff thought it could wait, I ended up in hospital! During my follow up appointment with my GP which because I had been in hospital I was able to arrange via the reception staff, my GP was slightly irritated at me not being seen as it is important and could prevent hospital admissions.

Since that follow up appointment there is a flag which says if I am phoning in about my asthma I am to be seen by either my GP or one of the nurse practitioners who know my chest very well. There is also a flag that if I say I need antibiotics I can have a phone call rather than appointment and a final flag that if I feel I need to go to hospital they are to call the respiratory reg on call and arrange this.

Having these flags has made such a difference and offered a sense of security as I know if my asthma is bad then I will be dealt with urgently. Obviously if I call about something else I would need to wait just like everyone else.

I realise I am very fortunate to have all this set up. I wanted to highlight it so that others can ask their GP surgeries about this to help them manage their asthma better as it is a huge stressor when you asthma is bad and not able to get the help. Something so simple as a flag can make the world of difference.

It’s ok to not be ok.

This past week has been really tough. Asthma is one of those conditions that is on a spectrum. Going from those with the mildest of asthma to those with the most severe and life threatening asthma you get everyone across the board and you can not pick out the one person with mild and the one person with severe asthma. You can’t see asthma, sometimes you can hear it depending on how wheezy you are!!!

Recovery from this last hiccup has taken a lot longer than I ever anticipated. It was not the worst of attacks but equally was not the mildest either. I was only in hospital for a week yet it has taken me a good 3 weeks to get back on my feet and still Im not there yet.

I have been so fortunate this time to have the support of my consultant. When I say support I mean that should I have issues he has said so many times that I just need to call his secretary and she will get him to call me back or the resp reg on call to give me a call. Having that support is so reassuring to me it makes life that little bit easier. Also being seen in clinic every month (which is a faff but won’t be forever) and then on top of that I am at the ward once a month too for my mepolizumab injection with the asthma nurse specialists so if I have any issues I can ask them too.

As much support as there is they cannot speed up the recovery process and help with the everyday symptoms that just take time. The never ending fatigue that no matter how much you rest it just doesn’t go away (Thanks to prednisolone contributing to that), and no it doesn’t help by getting a good night sleep. It is a fatigue that is unlike no other- a fatigue that having a nap won’t fix, it is a feeling where your whole body feels double its weight, you are not tired and sleeping doesn’t help, but you just cant do anything. Until you have experienced it (which I hope you won’t) you have no idea what it is like. This is the really hard bit. Fatigue you cant see, and asthma you cant see.

Keeping your mind motivated is really hard when your body is preventing you from doing what you love. This is the challenge I keep facing. This time of year its all about Christmas, Christmas Parties, going out with friends, shopping and enjoying the festive period, but I feel like I am sitting watching the world go by and seeing photos of people enjoying themselves but I haven’t been able to join them. Just going to the shops to get the messages is hard enough leaving me exhausted.

One big thing that I am really finding hard and one friend who is also on biologic therapy said this can be a side effect is speed of recovery as well as joint and muscle weakness. Speed of recovery has been slow but as I keep trying to tell myself slow and steady wins the race- but truthfully its getting really wearing now. The other thing is the joint and muscles weakness. I always have some weakness after being in hospital as for most of it I am bed bound and not able to get up due to the inability to breath and also the number of IV lines I have which are often in my feet making walking a challenge. Building up slowly isn’t helping. The only way I can describe it is having DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) but having DOMS that won’t go away. Normally lasting 48 hours this has been 2 weeks now and my quads feel like they are ripping in half every time I go to sit down or stand up, occasionally jerking as I walk too, stairs are an interesting experience- thankfully I have a lift in my building so can avoid the stairs!!!

I am desperate to get back to work and my consultant knows this. I see him tomorrow to hopefully get the ok. I know it will be tough going back to work but I need something to mentally challenge me. I having been doing bits and pieces of research and evaluation of research conferences too. Evaluation forms I find are so hit or miss especially when there has been positive or negative things that you want to acknowledge etc- there is never the room and I end up putting a covering letter along with the form.

This whole recovery process and hospital admission this time has taught me a lot. The main thing I guess I have finally accepted is that it is ok to not be ok. It is ok to ask for help and admit when you are defeated. Over the years I have been made to see a psychologist to help me deal with life with severe asthma. You could say I was a bit resistant to it initially. I think it was the stigma I associated with it. I felt that if I was seeing a psychologist then something was wrong with me mentally and actually my problems were psychological rather than physical. I think I made this assumption because I was young (this was over 12 years ago) and at the time there was really not much openness about mental health and it really was stigmatised. In more recent years as my asthma has impacted my life in ways I never thought it would and prevented me doing more than I ever thought I have been so thankfully to have access to a psychologist  who I can see regularly and help deal with the restrictive aspects of living with such severe asthma. What I have found though is that I have focused so much on adapting life to cope with my asthma and the majority has been on pacing. I didn’t realise that a major area which we never worked on or spoke about was the severe life threatening attack that comes out the blue much like this last one was, and also the trauma after it. It has almost felt like a mild version of post traumatic stress because even at clinic last week I got this huge sense of fear when I saw those windows of the ICU again.

So tomorrow I have a variety of different appointments all at different hospitals. The morning I have the asthma nurse specialists for my mepolizumab injection and review with my consultant, then the eye pavilion to have tests done on my eye that has lost its peripheral vision and then over to the royal infirmary to see the psychologist and will go up to see work and discuss coming back.

I hope that getting back to work and routine will maybe improve the fatigue I have and give me a purpose to my day again.

2nd dose of Mepolizumab in the bag

Thats the second dose of mepolizumab done and dusted. Now to wait till next month for my next injection next month.

So many people have been asking me how I feel and if the new drug is helping or making a difference, or ask me when I will start noticing the benefits. Its really hard to tell. I am feeling some positive effects from it I think and there have been a few side effects but nothing major.

The most telling sign is that I have noticed my peak flow has been increasing and I have not been in my red zone since the 19th September. That is a full 10 days. It may not seem like a great achievement and many will not agree with me for being excited that I have gone ten days and not dropped my peak flow but the nature of my asthma has meant that my peak flow is all over the place and so has my control been. I must say my asthma control has not been poor through my own choice and I have tried desperately hard to keep it n control. I have not managed to get into my green zone since June but I am happy with that. Better to be stable and sitting in my amber zone stable than jumping up and down with readings all over the place. I think slow and steady is the way to improve….it has after all only taken 14 plus years to get to this point.

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Other than looking at peak flow results and keeping track of how much salbutamol (both nebuliser and inhaler) I am using how do I actually feel? DoI feel different?? It is hard to say. My prednisolone dose has not been reduced and has been kept at the same dose since I was discharged from hospital in April. I am finding it hard to identify if feeling well and pretty stable is because of the steroids or due to the introduction of the mepolizumab. Once I have my 3rd injection I am hoping my consultant sticks with his plan and we can start the slow process of reducing the prednisolone. I am aware I won’t get off it (or may get off it and converted to hydrocortisone due to adrenal failure) but lower will suit me just fine.

Since starting the mepo I have not been to bad with side effects. After the first I had a bad headache the first time but the second dose was not as bad. A bit of a sore head but nothing to major. The one thing I have noticed and I am not sure if it is coincidence or what but I have been waking up in the morning feeling like I am drowning or choking on the amount of phlegm I have on my chest. I have always had a bit of a productive chest- it goes with the territory of having lung disease but this is different. I am still not sleeping super well but I am wondering if that because I am sleeping slightly better and not waking up so much the phlegm is building up rather than me waking having a cough moving all the stuff and then settling back down. I guess the good thing is that all the movement of phlegm means I (fingers crossed) won’t be as susceptible to a chest infection and may notice them quicker as everything is moving so will see the colour changes. Although this is good that I am moving stuff in my chest I find in the morning I am having to do more saline nebulisers and a lot of physio to move it and it has often made me sick because of it. This is a minor price to pay though in terms of side effects.

With this medication as I have said before I won’t see improvements over night but will over time and I think I am starting to see them. The other thing I have noticed and finding it more and more is that people are telling me how well I look and don’t sound as bad which is probably the best part. The past 3 weekends have been jam packed full of different things- mainly lacrosse and by the end of each weekend I have been on my knees longing for my bed but I have managed them. I have managed to spend these weekends on the side lines of a lacrosse field, or in the middle of a lacrosse field coaching  with either Edinburgh Uni or Scotland (Scotland is just goalkeepers and assistant manager). A lie in over a weekend would be lovely and in the past weekends have been all about recovering and getting myself prepared for the next week of work but I have been able to use these weekends to do what I love and not suffer at work. Don’t get me wrong it was so hard to get up on Monday but I think most people find it hard to get up on a Monday morning for work so being what I called “normal” person tired is awesome.

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One thing I am very thankful for is having people around me who can keep me grounded and don’t let me get ahead of myself. I have always been someone who will try and do the long distance run before I can jog let alone walk so even though I may get grumpy at people holding me back I do appreciate it. Coach Dave at Scotland Lacrosse knows when to reign me in and make sure I just take it easy and ensures I just walk or rest when I perhaps am going full steam.

I have an excitement in my life just now something that I have not had in a long time. I look forward to being able to plan things in advance and not worry that I may need to cancel or not be well enough to attend. I am aware that there will still be times when my lungs just stop me from doing what I want but through this I have also learnt to appreciate life, not take it for granted and just live for the moment.

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Asthma Rule 1: ALWAYS have your reliever with you.

On twitter recently you may have seen that I had a small rant about something that happened the other day and I am still reeling over it. I think what got me most is that how are we ever going to change attitudes towards asthma if those with asthma are so cavalier about it.

I was at a Design Informatics Collider with a variety of industry partners, researchers, clinicians, researchers and patients. The theme of the event was ‘Design Support for Asthma’ and what can be done to help asthmatics or those who care for asthmatics which in turn would help asthmatics. There was a group of us patients there from the patient an public involvement group at the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research. I have met most of the patients before who were there and as always it is great to meet new people in the group too.

So what happened??

One of the patients there was chatting about their asthma and their asthma control but then announced and announced proudly that they had not brought a reliever inhaler with them for the trip (baring in mind they came up by train and stayed overnight). They had their preventer inhaler but stated that their asthma was so well controlled that they knew they would not need their reliever. I was gobsmacked by this, and even quite angry about it especially the pride that the statement was delivered with.

Asthma is such a dangerous condition and there has been so much in the press recently about how many people die from asthma, how under funded asthma research is and just generally how bad the asthma situation is. The national review of asthma deaths (NRAD) which was published 2014 highlighted just how dangerous asthma is and how it is those with relatively mild asthma that are at the biggest risk from death and this year the news broke that rather than there being an improvement in the asthma death rate it has in fact got 20% worse not better.

I feel really passionately that even if you are so confident in your asthma and asthma control as an asthmatic you should never leave without a reliever inhaler especially if you are away overnight. For me my inhaler is my security blanket. I always have a ventolin (reliever) in my pocket, even when in hospital and on oxygen and nebulisers I still have my ventolin in my pocket too!! Asthma is such a fickle disease and you never know when a trigger is going to cause your airways to react and tighten up. The reason that was given for not having a reliever with them was that the weather was ok and they would not be affected by any triggers despite saying in the next breath last time they were up they had to climb stairs and were in a really bad way after this- there was no guarantee that there would be no stairs this time round.

I think the main thing that got me was that being involved in AUKCAR and being a member of the PPI group you would think that those in the group are those who are proactive about their condition, wanting to set a good example and manage their condition to the best of their ability. To do this one of the key things is to have all your medications with you. It may end up that you don’t need it, but its better having it all with you and not require it then need your reliever and not have it. Asthma and our airways don’t stop and think that they better not tighten up and become symptomatic because your don’t have your inhaler. They are going to do what they want when they want.

I am still reeling over it and so glad that there were no members of the children and young persons group there because they are impressionable and may think that because someone older than them is not carrying their reliever with them so they don’t need to either. I feel really passionately that if you are part of a group and forward facing attending groups where there are a mix of different professions who are putting a lot of time, dedication and effort into a career of helping those with asthma then you need to be acting in a responsible manner and not bragging that you don’t carry a reliever inhaler because what researchers or clinicians are going to want to help asthmatics when those they are consulting with are not being sensible and taking their condition seriously.