How do you write a blog post?

A phone call with author of Stumbling in Flats turned from working with pharma to writing in blog posts. A blogger for 13/14 years I have never thought about my blog posts and I have made it known that I just let my fingers do the work letting the words flow from brain to the page. I learnt some valuable information from that phone call.

A witty captive opening statement “Chocolate haunts me. Last night I dreamt a giant Jaffa  Cake chased me down the road

Im not sure I can do the witty part but I need to think about the opening statement. Something that draws people in and sets the scene of my post. I guess it is like basic story telling, a beginning a middle and an end. A story is only as good as its first sentence. If you don’t like it then you probably are not going to keep reading. A blog is just the same.

I also learnt that a post should be able to read stand alone and the reader will know what  you are talking about and not need to read every blog post you have ever written to know who you are and what your story is!

A good about page is also essential. I must update mine ASAP. The fact that I cant remember when I last updated it means it needs updated urgently!!!

The last point was post length. Set a limit. 400-500 words is about right. There are some posts where I ramble on- often when I am trying to tell a story to get stuff off my chest or just to get something off my chest!! Strange to be saying that I write to get stuff off my chest when all my problems occur because of my chest!!!

Here’s hoping for some new and captivating blog posts that I can still get the same positive relief from personally and that people might read.

I started my blog because I was struggling to deal with the impact my asthma was having only life. This was a time when blogging was not such a big thing, social media was in its infancy and smart phones did not exist. As technology evolves so must we. Blogs have so much impact on people within the chronic health community and also those who are affected by it wether that be family, friends or even those working in the medical field. The one thing that is still the same to some extent is that I still blog to help myself deal with the impact asthma has on my life.

#MentalHealthAwarenessWeek2019 Acceptance

In my first post for #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek2019 I looked at dealing with being in denial. Wether that denial be of your physical health or your mental health, I am sure it is something we have all done. Tried to brush things off and say I’m fine. But what does saying fine really mean. To me now saying “fine” says a lot more that it means. To me when someone says they are fine it means they don’t know how to explain how they feel, or they don’t want to admit how they feel, or they don’t know how they feel. This happened just tonight speaking to a friend whose response to my how are you? was Im fine when clearly they were not.

I think we all just jump to I’m fine because we think it will not lead to anymore questions and we can move on to a different topic. Why do I think this? I used to be that person and still am sometimes. I would think if I said I was fine then I would be left alone to get on with things and could feel rubbish with out anybody pestering me. When I first started seeing a psychologist we spent a session talking about “Im fine” and why we use it. It was interesting to explore it further. It caused me a lot of pain as it brought up thoughts I didnt want to deal with, and made me realise my situation but now I look back and see I needed it otherwise I would still be telling people I am fine when I am falling apart.

Exploring the I’m fine became a lot more. It helped me accept my health. It helped me move out of a denial phase where I wanted to pretend to everyone I was ok. I didnt want to be the weak one who struggled to breathe or could work like everyone else. I didnt want a condition that can be considered by many as “just asthma” to rule my life and dictate it so if I didnt knowledge it to other people then everyone was happy as larry. All this did was hurt me more as no one else was getting more unwell or lonely because of my asthma and my health it was only me I was punishing.

Opening up and being able to explain how you feel is hard. I started off by trying to verbalise it but I found doing word clusters easier. I had 3 sheets of paper and each one contained a word: asthma, physically, and mentally. I also had coloured pens where I then wrote down how each word made me feel right there and then in one colour, in another colour I wrote down how i have felt in the past and then in a third colour I wrote down how I wanted to feel about the words.

This task made me accept my health both physically and mentally. It made me acknowledge that asthma is not just a physical condition but impacts you mentally as well. By treating each part in isolation I was never going to be able to really get to where I want to go. One each sheet of paper I had the same words particularly with where I wanted to be in the future. I had a common goal across everything and this is when I realised that to achieve that goal I need to look at every aspect of my health and how my condition is effecting me.

I found also that by doing this task I accept my health. I was able to see where I was and where I wanted to go. Rather than focusing on the here and now I was able to set goals for the future both short and long term. Goals which are achievable but also including some that are going to push me because you don’t want to make life too easy. Doing this meant I evaluated myself there and then, how I was feeling, what I needed to do to keep me stable or what I needed to do to change the situation I was in if it was a bad day. Accepting that you can have bad days is a big part of this but to accept bad days I found I need to have strategies on how to fix these bad days. It was not about looking for a fix such as a cure but looking at things that can still be done and achieved despite you not feeling well. For me a big part of not feeling well was feeling like I was failing. If I was not well enough to work or when i cut my hours cut down I found myself sitting at home thinking I should be at work just now but am not because of my lungs. Accepting that this is where I was at that point and doing something to change it even though I am not able to change my lungs I can change what my brain is doing. For me that is being involved in research. No matter how unwell I feel I will always be able to be involved in research.

One of the other big things about moving from denial to acceptance is evaluating yourself. You are going to have days where you slip back into the Im fine I don’t want to talk about things from time to time but if you can reflect back on why you felt like that. It might be that it was the people you were around you at the time and you did not want to share your feelings with them. This is ok. Everything has to be done in your own pace. Some people maybe able to reflect on themselves and feel they can shout from the rooftops about their condition and how it makes them feel where others cant tell a sole. Everyone is different and everyone has their own way of dealing with it.

I would be really interested to hear about how others found self acceptance of their health when they had previously been in denial about anything being wrong with them. I am always intrigued as to what skills others utilise to help them.

The above is just my experience. It might not be right for anyone else, but I found this is how I got my head around things and accepting how my asthma is impacting on life and how I felt about my asthma, the impact it has on my physical and mental health too.

One thing I want to get across this week is that a physical health condition is not isolated to just the physical body, and a mental health condition is not just associated with your mental state. They all over lap with each other and to truly get the best management for you everything needs to be looked at not just the condition in isolation.

My HealtheVoices19 experience!

Last night I was catching up on reading some blogs and came across one that was written by one of the other people who attended HealtheVoices (HeV) who opened her blog post with my exact thoughts. She had been drafting and redrafting posts about her experiences of HealtheVoices and not knowing quite how to write it. She came down to the point of just getting it out and putting it down in a post. So this is what I am going to do as well because like her I have been going over how to write my experience and then rewriting it and never being happy or knowing quite how to word it.

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So here goes…

Leaving the UK to go to Dallas was a mix of nerves and excitement. The lead up to the HeV event was so positive and the support from everyone was there right from the start so I was feeling at ease but also felt a little is this really going to be like this once I am there too. A small hiccup at the airport but I was soon at the hotel and getting ready to settle in.

There was no real plans for the Thursday night. There was dinner but it was a buffet and you could just go down and eat when you wanted. I am never very good at these things and went downstairs several times with the intention of going in to the dinner room but I kept bottling it so would head back up to my room. I was too nervous, and tired because I was still on UK time and had been up for about 24 hours at this point, but I needed to get over jet lag so I could enjoy the conference without crashing, so I forced myself to go in and join a table. I am so glad I did go down. The slight awkwardness of plating my food and all the time thinking which table should I ask to sit at, who won’t mind if I join them, there was 101 things flying through my head but actually some of those who I had my first meal with in Dallas are also the ones I had my last lunch with as well. I did have that bit of security with me at dinner though- I had my name badge/lable/neck thing so anyone I met knew my name, knew I was speaking but also knew that it was my first time attending the conference.

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When I have attended conferences in the past I have felt at ease, and with each conference I attend and speak at I feel more confident but this was different. When I have spoken at conferences I have been there and what I am speaking about is my specialist interest and my experience, I tended to be the patient giving my opinion of essentially being an expert patient. This was a different ball game. Everyone there was like me, we are all experts at living with our own conditions and doing our own thing to raise the profile and difficulties we face trying to live a functional life.

I have never really thought of the work I do with asthma as advocacy, I actually didn’t like the word advocacy but attending HeV I came away feeling that maybe it was and I was an asthma advocate. People often ask me what drives me to do what I do, how do I come up with content, ideas etc. I never really know how to answer because I have never thought about why I do these things. I just do it because I hope that by sharing my story maybe people or even just one person might be able to take something from it and their experience will be a bit easier.

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It sounds cliche but after my initial nerves everyone was so welcoming at the meeting. Wether you were a first timer or had been at all the HeV meetings in the past everyone was on the same level- we were all there for one reason. Everyone there is motivated to help make a change. There was a variety of people who have had a condition all their life, then some with conditions that vary, go into remission or are cured from it but through their experience they are sharing knowledge gained, experiences which were good or bad.

I still really am struggling to put into words all my emotions from the meeting but I think the photos speak for themselves.

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So where do I go from here??

I have a few projects that I would like to pursue the most pressing one is to try and get rid of all the stock images media outlets are using which are subconsciously promoting poor inhaler technique. Almost every day I see a photo being used on a media article which shows a child or adult using a MDI (metered dose inhaler) with no spacer and even though there is no spacer the technique is not good either. In the UK there is an inherent problem with asthma management and self management resulting in high death levels from asthma attacks which can be prevented. One of these preventions is correct inhaler technique.

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And a last disclaimer:

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