Smoking on NHS sites- it is STILL happening!!

I know many of you will think I sound like a broken record particularly as I have written several blog posts around the issue of the smoking ban on NHS premises. The first of my posts was back in 2015 on April 2nd. written after legislation was passed by the Scottish Government to implement a ban on smoking on NHS hospital sites. This came into force on the 1st April and must have been an april fool as it is still not been addressed. The links to other posts surrounding smoking on NHS sites are:

Over the course of time I have been in touch with various different outlets and services to try and get action taken on the issue of continued smoking on NHS sites. The situation for me has only go worse. It appeared that every day there were more and more people congregating outside the main doors of the hospital smoking. This could be a mix of patients, visitors and most shockingly people who worked in the hospital.

For me it got to the point that even coming to work half an hour early was not enough to avoid the people smoking. Eventually it made the choice on stopping doing clinical work easy as it meant I would not be putting my life at risk just to get into work. In fact the other week I had to go to the Royal for a ECHO of my heart, I called to have this rearranged because already feeling very chesty and unsure if I was going to need to be admitted, I saw this huge group of people smoking right outside the doors. I couldn’t risk going past. It may have cost the NHS some money by me cancelling last minute my appointment but it is far less money than the amount of money that would be required for me to go to A&E, +/- ICU, and the ward all because I tried to get into the hospital (a plan of safety I might add) to attend an appointment. In an extreme view the select patients that are smoking are preventing a group of patients accessing healthcare safely. What will it cost for this to be addressed.

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(Photo above was me after having an attack trying to get in to work a few years back)

Clearly legislation being passed in the Scottish Government is not enough. I am unsure why the issue is so much worse at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh than other sites in Edinburgh.

If the smoke did not have such a bad effect on my lungs physically I would go up to people and tell them they cant smoke there and they need to move off hospital property but that is just asking for a hospital admission for me. I think what makes me really angry and disappointed is that no one is willing to address the smoking issue.

I took the opportunity when there was uproar about parking and parking provision to use this to voice my concerns about the smoking. I got in touch with various MSP’s and had some great feedback from them and help from them however I am totally disgusted by NHS Lothians response. They wrote a letter to my MSP which basically says what they do just now is enough and no more can be done. What they said they have done is:

  1. Provision of support for patients, staff and visitors who wish to give up smoking
  2. Provision of advice regarding medication which helps manage nicotine withdrawal
  3. Promotion of education and training for managers and front line staff in the implementation of the policy

What strikes me with these actions is that it is all about what they are doing to help those that smoke nothing is there to help those who do not smoke and are being affected by those smoking. The actions are also leaving it up to the smokers to get the help. They are not actually doing anything to stop the smoking in places that are meant to be no smoking. The letter also sited the design of the hospital means that people are likely to congregate at the doors to smoke.

To say I was shocked, appalled at the letter is an understatement. The over riding emotion though was disappointment. My MSP had put that one of the reasons for me not working at the hospital just now was due to the issue of people smoking but this was not even mentioned in the response. There was a line that said they were sorry I felt the need to report this complaint and they apologise for the distress and inconvenience this has caused. Distress and inconvenience is an understatement- they clearly have no idea about what going to intensive care is like, what fighting for your life is like and knowing that the very place that saves your life is also the very place that could take your life too.

I have no idea what to do now. Will I be able to return to work in the hospital if this issue is not resolved? I don’t think so. I love my job, but I love my life (most of the time) and if doing my job is going to kill me can I really justify going back to work.

I will spend as much time as possible to try and get this situation the attention it deserves because there is no way it can only be me that is suffering. There must be hundreds if not thousands of other people being bothered by this.

Below are links to some posts I have written around about the issues I have dealt with to do with smoking and people smoking on NHS sites.

23 days on and its only got worse is a post I wrote 23 days after the so called smoking ban came into force. It appears to have only made things worse. I am not one for advocating smoking but the removal of the smoking shelters has made things so bad.

Returning to work in a fog of smoke is about returning to work after having an asthma attack as a result of second hand smoke. Reading it back I get quite emotional as I was struggling to accept that I had done nothing to myself to end up with lungs like this- often I wish I had done something like smoked as then at least there is a reason for my lungs being so bad.

Smoking on hospital sites reflecting back and just finding the issue getting worse and worse. Also thinking of ideas of things I could do that would maybe have some effect on those smoking that they would not like much like their smoke has on others.

Bad weather makes smoking worse

Passive smoking what does it mean

The NHS long term plan

Parking is not the only issue at the RIE

 

The Intensive Care Unit

I have written often about being admitted to intensive care or the high dependancy unit or being reviewed by critical care staff and it always something I have just sort of dealt with and not thought to much more about it. That was until last night. I couldn’t sleep for tossing and turning thinking about how many times I have been in ICU or HDU or had the threat of going there.

Why all of a sudden has it bothered me??

Yesterday was the first meeting of the Critical Care Patient and Public Involvement Group (which I will write more about in a post of its own). A room full of patients who have been in ICU or their relatives, Drs and Nurses from ICU and then researchers whose area is critical care.

Naturally when you have a group of patients together you are naturally going to ask how you are linked with the group and I guess what your story is. In the discussion part of it there were 2 other patients who spoke of their experience being in ICU and how it was awful, the worst time of their life and how the Drs and nurses saved their life because their life was in their hands. It was a traumatic experience for them and they have got through it. I heard the saying “surviving ICU” a lot.

“Surviving ICU” was what bothered me and kept me awake. I think maybe I under estimate how bad my asthma is or maybe how sick I get or how dependent on medical staff I am to get me better. I know that my asthma is severe and I know there are many more hospital admissions, HDU admissions or ITU admissions ahead of me and I think i sort of accepted this maybe. It was not until that group discussion that I realised just how traumatic it is, life threatening it is, and how it is not run of the mill to go in and out of critical care. At the time I was able to keep my emotions in check but when I got home and set up my nebulisers that it really hit me. The other people in the group had a one off experience, this is what ICU is meant to be like ideally a never experience but if it is going to happen then once is more than enough not once or twice a year sometimes more.

In my working life you hear about people going to intensive care, its not looking good for them or statements that you mainly go out ICU horizontally not vertically. I think for me I have always come out of ICU so would never dwell on the experience of being admitted. I cant say it is a pleasant experience not being able to breath and having the most toxic drugs that make you feel horrendous to make you better but it gets better, I go to the resp ward recover and get back home. It is how it goes and has been for the last 14 odd years.

So after that meeting and hearing others speak about ICU it has almost given me a fear. In the back of my mind I know there are only so many times you go to intensive care or high dependancy and get out but so far I always get out and sometimes bounce back but then get out again. I think it is the emotions that I could see on the other patients faces when they recalled their experiences that it hit me that maybe I don’t have the right emotion to it. The fear they had and the gratitude to the Drs for saving their life was clear to see. Its not that I don’t appreciate what the Drs do but I guess I just never wanted to admit that Im going to intensive care because its the safest place and I might just be that unwell that action needs to happen quickly. Every attack I have I am terrified that it might kill me and that asthma may just win the battle and Im sure I have surpassed that thought as it is very over dramatic and im young so it won’t happen but seeing younger patients have that fear of death and the unknown.

I have never really expressed my fears of my asthma to those close to me. I try to give the outward opinion that its fine, its life, its been long enough now I should be used to it. I would like to be able to have a conversation with people about asthma and death but would worry they think I am just being over dramatic and its never going to happen. Maybe I should though as a comment  that occurred really hit me and made me think about how those close to me feel and thought about my asthma and health. Recently a very close friend died, my mum was away, I was home but she read a text out loud and said “oh my god she’s died”. My step dad thought it was me that had died not the friend. This really hit me that if they hear something about someone dying they go to me and think it is me. I try so hard to keep well and take my medications etc but its still not good enough. I always knew they worried about me doing to hospital but never thought about the dying aspect of it.

What I find so difficult and I think it includes the whole critical care thing is that in the past I have been rogue with managing my asthma. I was young and didnt understand it and didnt want to accept it so I would increase medication so I could do something only to crash and burn and end up in hospital. That changed after a consultant had a go at me (they were just stern and didnt mess about but i felt awful so took it worse than had I been well) which I well and truly deserved but I stopped messing about and accepted not being well and accepted what I could and couldn’t do. The point I found so hard was that despite this change in behaviour and management I was still ending up in ICU or HDU but not having the good bit beforehand which I had before. To this day I still really cant accept the ICU or HDU admission for nothing. I get it if I was to go and play a game of football have a bad asthma attack and need critical care- I deserved it, I did something my body cant handle but now I try my best and still end up going there and that is the hard bit. Where before if I hadn’t been doing anything attacks would mean hospital and a respiratory ward where now it is resus, critical care and then respiratory ward. With this development what happens when it gets worse……

Lots to think about.

Patient Centred Care

I have quite a few different blogs in my head after my last hospital admission due to a variety of things that happened.

Where better than to start at the beginning.

It was the usual start= difficulty breathing so did I usual nebuliser treatments and thought I should probably call 999 as I wasn’t getting much relief. The call handler was great. I normally just hang up but she stayed on the phone with me until the paramedics arrived which was good as it took a wee bit longer for them to come so she was able to distract me from focusing on being scared that I couldn’t breathe.

The paramedics did their usual. Although my blood pressure was through the roof which normally happens but later on. I think it just shows that I had been struggling for a while given how quickly it went up but also how quickly my heart rate was going too. Apparently the Western General doesn’t take emergency asthma attacks anymore as they are not equipped (despite going there in February) so I had to go over to the Royal Infirmary which isn’t my favourite but as it turns out it was a good thing I went there. So blue lights across town which is something I can never get my head round, part of me would love to be feeling well when going across town with the blue lights to see where they go and stuff but to have blue lights is really not a good thing so not being able to remember it is not good either. I would prefer to get myself across town to the hospital without needing an ambulance or not require the hospital at all.

The guys in A&E are fantastic straight into resus and getting sorted out. The challenge of getting a cannula in started and once they got it in the radiographer who was less than pleasant trying to get me into odd positions and not sympathetic to the situation did her best to pull it out and almost succeeded but for the quick hand of the Dr.

I did laugh though as the Consultant who I saw first uttered those words all asthmatics hate ‘just relax and concentrate on your breathing’. I wanted to throttle him. He was a really chatty guy so I couldn’t at the time get a word in to say to him what I wanted to but after they got some magnesium, hydrocortisone and aminophylline running I was starting to feel a bit better and could talk a bit more. When he next came in I was able to wave at him and tell him about the BMJ article I wrote. He said he found it really good as he had never thought of asthma in that way and he thought that it looked so difficult for us to talk so we just shouldn’t. I explained that if an asthmatic didnt want to talk they probably wouldn’t rather than try to fit their words in around their breathing. There was a noticeable change in how he treated me after he read the article and was obviously applying new learning which s really rewarding to see.

The slightly negative part of the whole time in A&E was that they sent ITU to come see me as they felt I needed to be there rather than going to a monitored bed in the assessment unit. Thankfully an ITU Dr who has seen me before was the one to review me and gave me more time to try and get on top of things. I did manage this and was significantly better but was shocked when a nurse came and told me that I was going to Intensive Care. If I’m honest this freaked me out a bit. I had assorts of things flying round my head. I though I was doing better and I was wondering what they knew that I didnt, were my numbers worse, was I tiring and the adrenaline of the attack was keeping me going. I was quite upset by the thought of it. I said to the nurse I didnt want to go, who then got a junior Dr who told me I needed to be there. The junior Dr got the consultant who by this time was a different one from earlier as the shifts changed.

This is where I cannot thank the A&E Dr enough. I thought I was in for it and going to be told I was unreasonable, and didnt know what was best for me because the Dr walked in looking at me carrying a chair, shut the curtains and sat down. At this point I thought she was going to tell me I had to go to ITU and had no choice etc. I was so wrong. She sat down and asked me how I felt and gave me her rationale for going to ITU. But I was able to tell her my fears of going to ITU and just that I felt significantly better from when ITU came and reviewed me. But also I was able to share my fears about ITU. Every attack I have now I end up in ITU or HDU. I honestly thought this time I was doing better and didnt need to go. The Consultant spoke to the on call Resp Reg about me and my concerns etc. It was agreed that I didnt need to go to ITU and could go to a monitored bed but should anything change and I get a little bit worse at all then there was a really low threshold for me to be moved to ITU.

What I really liked about the A&E Consultant was that she was all about the patient, and what is best for the patient, and involving the patient in the decisions about their care. When first taken into Resus you don’t get a say in what is happening as they are running around trying to save your life and that is their sole focus rather than if you want that or the next but the move out of resus and into the high care area sort of signals the change in care and is a move when the patient can be involved in their treatment and have input into what they think best and have discussion with Dr’s.

I was and still am so grateful for the Dr who took the time to speak to me and listen to me about my concerns of going to ITU and why I felt I didnt need to go there. I understand that if I need to go then I need to go and ultimately if after that chat the Dr still said I had to go to ITU I would go as I am not going to go against what the Dr’s say but being heard and listened to makes such a difference.

As it happens I needed up going to Critical Care anyway but that was due to an anaphylactic reaction which caused my chest to deteriorate rather than just an isolated deterioration in my asthma.

I must say this really was an excellent example of patient centred care and when patient centred care is appropriate and when it is not.

No wonder asthmatics don’t go to hospital early!

One of my previous posts I titled as the most terrifying experience. At the time I thought it was, but sadly it was not and last week it went to a whole new level of scariness.

I had not been discharged long but I needed up needing to go back to hospital.

It all started well. I was seen in resus and after a few hours was stabilised with IV Magnesium, IV Salbutamol, IV Hydrocortisone and lots of nebulisers driven by oxygen. All was going well. My care plan was being followed and all going well. Maybe a little to well!! Coming out of resus was where it all went downhill and led to the worst time I have ever had.

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Being moved from resus to IC/HD is always a good move so when they said I was moving I was happy. It meant I was getting better and on the road to recovery. This was not the case this time. There was a plan in place for when I was moved. To continue on back to back nebs to keep on top of my attack but this was not done. I had to wait an hour and a half and ask over 6 times to get a neb to be told by a nurse I was fine and he was too busy and would come back to be later. By this time my blood pressure was rising my heart rate was rising and my oxygen was dropping. This was not the time to say I was fine and he would come back to me. I felt the nurse didnt think I was ill. I thought he thought that because I was young I would be ok. I was not ok. I was terrified. It was harder and harder to breathe and I thought by going in early I would be seen early and be back out again. I kept asking for nebulisers and not getting them. writing it like that makes it sound like I was unhappy because I was not getting what I wanted but it was far from it. I was desperate for a neb. My chest was getting tight and I really couldn’t breathe. On top of that I was scared and thinking all this stuff about what might happen. Eventually I got to see a Dr who questioned why I had not had the nebs etc I was meant to. I felt relief at being given a neb but also because I thought the plan would be followed again.

I got two nebs but after that it all slipped away again. I tried to tell the nurse about my care plan but was told he didnt need to see it and wasn’t his concern. I kept asking for nebs but was being told he was too busy. I am sure he was busy but all the times he told me he was busy would have taken up more time than actually giving me a neb and the amount of time he had to look after me in the long run. I ended up using my own supply of nebules to treat myself as I felt so scared and want to get better. By this time I had had enough. I tried to get up so I could get dressed but I fell and really hurt my knee but at this point a combination of lethargy, fear, tiredness and the effects of the asthma attack were taking their toll and I decided it was time to self discharge myself. It was rash but I felt it necessary. It got the attention I needed and the Dr came over to see me with the nurse in tow. I also ended up being reviewed by intensive care. I told the nurse that this was all on him and if I went to ITU or had a prolonged admission it was on him and I strongly believe it was. His attitude was horrible and it has made me really question going into hospital and getting help. If I saw him again as I came into A&E I would refuse to go in as I really thought I may not get out of A&E in his hands.

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After falling and threatening to self discharge I was moved through to the assessment unit where I was in such a state they wanted to give me lorazepam to calm me down. Thankfully the Dr had been filled in on what had happened and knew I just needed out of A&E and I would be ok and they were right. The rest of the admission was fairly uneventful but I shall blog about it another time.

I wanted to concentrate on my experience in A&E. I have had so much time to think about it and the consequences of it. A few years ago the national review of asthma deaths was published highlighting the shocking statistics of asthma death and admissions to hospital. From this I tried my hardest to make sure I was very proactive with my treatment and get help quickly to as to make asthma less of a killer than it is. How can we do this if asthma is not taken seriously in hospital where it is meant to be safe and you are meant to be looked after.

I am lucky in that I have been to hospital a lot and luckily never had such an experience and I knew what I needed. What would have happened had I been new to asthma or not known what was happening. I was able to self medicate to make sure I was ok but others may not have been so lucky and the statistics would just get worse. 

The support I have received from Drs, and the respiratory nurses has been fantastic and I have had the help to come to terms with what has happened and also will get the help to put a complaint in about the treatment I received. It is important that feed back is given because if I have been so scarred by events imagine what someone else could have been. They may have taken themselves out of A&E and died from not getting help for their asthma. Its important to get the message out and get people to see how serious asthma is.

I have never made a complaint to a hospital about the treatment I received but I feel this time it is so important that I do for a number of reasons. I was still trying to come to terms with my previous hospital admission and how I went down hill so quickly in a safe environment, I also had lacrosse trials of Scotland and it was my 30th birthday which I had a number of plans for. All of which I missed as a result of the poor care I was given. I may be unfairly putting all the blame on one person and that person being the nurse but to me it is no
t unfair. The way in which I was spoken to and the lack of respect and care I was given has left a huge black mark and really scarred me. For my own sanity I need to deal with this and make it known what happened and what is being done to resolve it.

It will take a lot for me to get my confidence back and feel safe going to A&E again. I know I will have to go back to A&E at some point and the whole reason I do everything about raising awareness for asthma is to changes opinions of asthma and get people getting help early by taking it seriously. If I don’t feel confident and don’t go to hospital for help then I am a hypocrite and should stop doing all the raising awareness and campaigning I do.

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As you can tell this has left a really black mark on me and I will get over it but it will take time. I do want to add that as a nurse myself I do understand how busy days/nights can get and we can’t do everything the patient wants us to do but when you see them laughing and joking and talking about nights out standing round the computer it is fair to see and hear they are not as busy as they are saying and when I see them as a patient doing this it makes me really angry.

I would hate to be in this situation again which is why I am going to share it with everyone I can. I could have gone home but I managed to stay and ended up receiving some of the best care I have had and did get better. I was not able to trial for lacrosse, or be at home for my birthday or go to any of the planned meals etc but I am now home and will enjoy that.

For now I will continue in the work I am doing to make sure that asthma is taken seriously and awareness raised.

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Are you your illness/ condition?

Recently in a lot of groups, on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram there have been various projects or statement about not being your illness/ condition and not letting it define you. So many people have been jumping on this and saying how they are not their condition, or that their condition is part of them but not who they are.

I’m not sure I agree with this. Asthma has dominated my life and dominated it even more so for the last 11 years. If I was to say I am not my condition or my condition does not define me would be a blatant lie.

I am my asthma and asthma is me. I will never be able to get away from it or have some memory of asthma around me everyday. As terrifying as having asthma is, as life limiting it is I am embracing have it. There are some really rough days where I wish I didnt have asthma. Those days where it is a fight to get every breath and just drinking is a mammoth effort I do wish I didnt have asthma. Then there are the days when having asthma doesn’t inhibit my ability to do anything as long as I take my inhalers, tablets and nebulisers. Those days are great. With the good days come the bad too.

Wishing for a cure is something I do everyday. To have a cure would mean my body is not crippled by side effects from taking prednisilone, my heart rate would drop below 100, I wouldn’t have a constant tremor from relying on short acting beta agonists, going outside I wouldn’t have to worry about what may happen which could provoke an attack, i wouldn’t need to plan my day around medication, I wouldn’t be on first name terms with my pharmacist, I wouldn’t know all the nurses in various respiratory wards around the UK. These are all things I wouldn’t have to do if a cure was found for asthma.

BUT

A cure is not going to come in the near future as nice as it wold be so until then I embrace having asthma. It is me, it is a massive part of my life. I hate it but at the same time having asthma has given me so much to live for. Just by having severe asthma I have done so many things I never would have thought about doing. My life is now defined by having severe asthma. My work was chosen based on my asthma, my volunteering is based on having asthma, my work with the research centre I would not do if I dint have asthma, my involvement in my lacrosse club would not be what it is if I didnt have asthma. I have no idea what my life would be like, Im sure it would be very different but would it be different in a good or bad way? Its a question I can never answer and I don’t want to know the answer.

The only thing I do want just now is to not have so many life threatening attacks which land me in the resus room and weeks in hospital. Those are fights I could do without. I would also love for my consultant to be able to over me different treatments to try and not need to take my case to a group of experts to try and find some kind of treatment to give me some life back.

In all I am my condition. To say Im not would be a lie. But I am proud to be defined by my asthma. Not having asthma I wouldn’t have done all I have. It would be nice for it to be a bit better controlled but in the future it will be.

What I want to say is all those who don’t want to be defined by their condition think about what you have done because you have it which you wouldn’t have done otherwise? Our conditions are part of us. They make us who we are. The stigma around having them is hard but when you embrace it mentally you can deal with it so much better!

It never gets easier!

Just under 2 weeks ago I had another pretty serious asthma attack which ended up with me being admitted to hospital for over a week. Over the years I have had loads of asthma attacks and all of varying degrees, different situations and surroundings yet this past one is one I am finding the most difficult to process and one I am feeling the most insecure and scared by. As far as asthma attacks go it was not the worst but not the mildest either. So what is bothering me so much?

The weeks preceding the attack I have been slowly but surly going down hill. I was having difficulty fighting off a viral infection which plagued me. Ironically when I got up to go to work the morning I ended up having an attack I actually felt better and thought I had turned a corner and was throwing off the infection. The previous day I felt awful and was debating not going into work. I felt better so I went in.

It didnt take long or much to start me sliding down the slippery slope. I had to go from inside to outside and back in again to see a patient and doing this really hit me. The change in temperature felt like fire in my chest. Walking back to my unit it felt like someone was tying a belt around my chest and not letting any air out. By the time I got back I knew I needed to go home but I didnt want to admit it. I found my charge nurse and told her. I don’t think I needed to tell her I was not well as her reaction was to take me into a treatment room for me to have a neb. I struggled to put it together but didnt want to show how much I was not managing. My charge nurse was great. She asked if I needed to go to A and E at which point I said yes. No sooner had I said yes, I was in a wheelchair and on the move to A and E. We flew through the corridors of the hospital. I don’t remember it at all really. The next thing I was there in triage having obs done. From here on everything moved so quick. I was hoisted up onto a trolley and taken through to the Resus room with a consultant and reg who looked after me. My anticipatory care plan came into its own as I didnt need to say much and all the information the Drs needed was there. I was in Resus for quite a while before I was stabilised and brought back into the main bit of A and E. The Drs were all fantastic. I needed a lot of IV medication this time. IV aminophylline was started in A and E. For me we normally wait a bit and see if lots of nebs etc can get on top of it because of the issues with my heart but the Dr’s decided to start it. I was glad as I was getting very tired and felt like I had no energy to fight anymore. I was moved through to a monitored bed in the assessment unit after that to wait to be seen by Respiratory and a bed in the Resp Ward.

The whole A and E experience was really weird for me. In fact the whole attack was. I don’t know how to feel about it. It was a number of firsts for me. It was the first A and E visit using my anticipatory care plan which worked well so thats good. This time was the first in a very long time I have ever had anyone with me in A and E. I often find it difficult to have people around me because I see how scared they can get and the fear I see in them makes me scared which ends up being a bit of a vicsious circle. I did like having someone with me. It was a comfort when getting stabbed and poked and all sorts to have someone there to distract you and take your mind off it. The other thing about this attack is that it was the first really serious attack I have had at work in front of my colleagues. I have had days where Im chesty and not great but never had a full blown asthma attack in front of any of them. They are all nurses so will have seen people with breathing difficulties but when it is your colleague it is a bit different. Part of my anxiety about this is that sometimes when I have an attack due to being short of breath and oxygen etc I can do and say stupid things (for example I once tried to squeeze through the cot sides of the bed cause I thought this was the way to get out of bed!!). You can do and say stupid things in front of family but work mates is a bit different.

I shouldn’t be surprised that it has happened. I have done pretty well to avoid any major attacks in front of them until now but it has shaken me quite a bit. This whole admission has shaken me quite a lot of a few different levels. I will post about them once I have sorted my thoughts from the rest of the admission out. I have only processed the acute phase of the attack as so much happened.

Facing Fears.

Part of this post is one of the hardest things I will ever write. It will be reliving the most terrifying asthma attack I have ever had and the experience of the whole admission.

Before I go to that I want to explain why I am doing this.

As a coping strategy I block out my asthma attacks. I don’t remember them wether it is a conscious or subconscious thing I am not sure. But I do record every time I am admitted into hospital, what ward I was admitted to and I keep my admission/ discharge letters which have a small description of events that happened. I want to try and learn from these admissions and make admissions more positive as they can often be very hard.

Moving to the hard bit.

6 years ago in June I had the worst hospital admission/ asthma attack I have ever experienced. I am not sure if it was the worst asthma attack but it was the hardest one to fight and one that didn’t really respond well to treatment.

The attack itself started as normal. I had some nebs and called 999 as it wasn’t getting any better. The paramedics arrived very quickly and I knew by their speed at getting me into the ambulance and over the the hospital that I was not particularly well. We went by blue lights across the city. It was a strange experience. I recall the shutter being open in the ambulance so I could see out the window as we travelled at speed across town. Going through red lights. I also thought it really odd that they cannulated me and put me on high flow oxygen rather than the usual nebulisers. They were giving me a lot of stuff through my IV but I am not sure what. For being so ill I felt not that ill. I think it was probably something to do with being very hypoxic. I almost act drunk when I am hypoxic. (When I was living down south the nurses laughed at me when I tried to squeeze between the cot sides to get out of bed- funny now but not at the time). Drs were waiting outside of A and E for me and I was wheeled into resus where they worked on me and got me stabilised a bit. I was not there long. I was moved to intensive care. The journey there I just remember seeing the ITU Dr with the intubation kit in the red backpack on their back and also a trolley with other stuff. there was a machine on my trolley which just beeped all the way.

I got to intensive care and recall wanting to get myself off the trolley into bed but not being allowed to. There were nurses and Drs everywhere. I didnt know who was who as they were all in blue scrubs. For some reason something I always remember is a bandage being cut to hold a ET tube should I be intubated. I don’t know why that is so clear. Everything becomes a bit hazy for a while after that. I think from that I perhaps ran out of adrenaline or knew I was in a safe environment and was going to be looked after and would be ok.

I was there for a few days. Before being moved to the respiratory ward I do clearly remember having a bed bath from a few nurses. I had a lot of lines, drips, catheters, oxygen so was not able to do things for myself. I was also totally exhausted. But this one nurse told me Michael Jackson had died. I thought he was joking. It seemed like such a strange thing to say. I didnt believe him until I was moved to the ward and saw a newspaper. It was true. It was odd to  not believe what someone had said. I think the whole experience in intensive care was surreal and I didnt want to believe it had happened but it had. The rest of the hospital admission was uneventful and I was discharged a few weeks later. The main thing was that for being so ill I didnt feel that unwell and have felt a lot more unwell when I have not been so unwell.

I reread my discharge letter. I know why I was sent to ITU.

My SpO2 was 89%, my HR was 134. My ABG was shocking. My PO2 was 4.8 and PCO2 was 5.3 and lactate was 11 so not a great ABG. My blood glucose was also high and put onto a sliding scale of insulin to bring it back down.

It haunts me this admission. What made it worse was that my parents were all away. It was the one time my mum, dad, step mum and step dad were all away. My uncle came in to see me and as grateful as I was for this it is not the same as your parents.

Getting through that hospital admission shows that I can get through hard hospital admissions but it does not make them any less scary or hard to deal with.

Im glad I can write about it. It has taken a while and other than posts where I remember people like Dawn, Rusty or others who have died it is one of the few times I have cried remembering what happened and crying while writing a post. I am glad I have done it. I hope by doing it that I won’t be haunted by the memories anymore.

I am sure there will be more difficult admissions which will challenge my strength and coping ability but will take it one at a time.