Smoking on NHS sites- it is STILL happening!!

I know many of you will think I sound like a broken record particularly as I have written several blog posts around the issue of the smoking ban on NHS premises. The first of my posts was back in 2015 on April 2nd. written after legislation was passed by the Scottish Government to implement a ban on smoking on NHS hospital sites. This came into force on the 1st April and must have been an april fool as it is still not been addressed. The links to other posts surrounding smoking on NHS sites are:

Over the course of time I have been in touch with various different outlets and services to try and get action taken on the issue of continued smoking on NHS sites. The situation for me has only go worse. It appeared that every day there were more and more people congregating outside the main doors of the hospital smoking. This could be a mix of patients, visitors and most shockingly people who worked in the hospital.

For me it got to the point that even coming to work half an hour early was not enough to avoid the people smoking. Eventually it made the choice on stopping doing clinical work easy as it meant I would not be putting my life at risk just to get into work. In fact the other week I had to go to the Royal for a ECHO of my heart, I called to have this rearranged because already feeling very chesty and unsure if I was going to need to be admitted, I saw this huge group of people smoking right outside the doors. I couldn’t risk going past. It may have cost the NHS some money by me cancelling last minute my appointment but it is far less money than the amount of money that would be required for me to go to A&E, +/- ICU, and the ward all because I tried to get into the hospital (a plan of safety I might add) to attend an appointment. In an extreme view the select patients that are smoking are preventing a group of patients accessing healthcare safely. What will it cost for this to be addressed.

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(Photo above was me after having an attack trying to get in to work a few years back)

Clearly legislation being passed in the Scottish Government is not enough. I am unsure why the issue is so much worse at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh than other sites in Edinburgh.

If the smoke did not have such a bad effect on my lungs physically I would go up to people and tell them they cant smoke there and they need to move off hospital property but that is just asking for a hospital admission for me. I think what makes me really angry and disappointed is that no one is willing to address the smoking issue.

I took the opportunity when there was uproar about parking and parking provision to use this to voice my concerns about the smoking. I got in touch with various MSP’s and had some great feedback from them and help from them however I am totally disgusted by NHS Lothians response. They wrote a letter to my MSP which basically says what they do just now is enough and no more can be done. What they said they have done is:

  1. Provision of support for patients, staff and visitors who wish to give up smoking
  2. Provision of advice regarding medication which helps manage nicotine withdrawal
  3. Promotion of education and training for managers and front line staff in the implementation of the policy

What strikes me with these actions is that it is all about what they are doing to help those that smoke nothing is there to help those who do not smoke and are being affected by those smoking. The actions are also leaving it up to the smokers to get the help. They are not actually doing anything to stop the smoking in places that are meant to be no smoking. The letter also sited the design of the hospital means that people are likely to congregate at the doors to smoke.

To say I was shocked, appalled at the letter is an understatement. The over riding emotion though was disappointment. My MSP had put that one of the reasons for me not working at the hospital just now was due to the issue of people smoking but this was not even mentioned in the response. There was a line that said they were sorry I felt the need to report this complaint and they apologise for the distress and inconvenience this has caused. Distress and inconvenience is an understatement- they clearly have no idea about what going to intensive care is like, what fighting for your life is like and knowing that the very place that saves your life is also the very place that could take your life too.

I have no idea what to do now. Will I be able to return to work in the hospital if this issue is not resolved? I don’t think so. I love my job, but I love my life (most of the time) and if doing my job is going to kill me can I really justify going back to work.

I will spend as much time as possible to try and get this situation the attention it deserves because there is no way it can only be me that is suffering. There must be hundreds if not thousands of other people being bothered by this.

Below are links to some posts I have written around about the issues I have dealt with to do with smoking and people smoking on NHS sites.

23 days on and its only got worse is a post I wrote 23 days after the so called smoking ban came into force. It appears to have only made things worse. I am not one for advocating smoking but the removal of the smoking shelters has made things so bad.

Returning to work in a fog of smoke is about returning to work after having an asthma attack as a result of second hand smoke. Reading it back I get quite emotional as I was struggling to accept that I had done nothing to myself to end up with lungs like this- often I wish I had done something like smoked as then at least there is a reason for my lungs being so bad.

Smoking on hospital sites reflecting back and just finding the issue getting worse and worse. Also thinking of ideas of things I could do that would maybe have some effect on those smoking that they would not like much like their smoke has on others.

Bad weather makes smoking worse

Passive smoking what does it mean

The NHS long term plan

Parking is not the only issue at the RIE

 

Parking is not the only issue at the RIE

In the press today and on social media there is a lot of energy being focused on the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh and its issue with parking. Ever since I have worked at the RIE there has always been an issue with parking. There has never been enough parking for the number of staff let alone patients or visitors.

This summer the new Sick Kids hospital is moving out to the RIE site as well as DCN. Now the new departments have been built on one of the previous car parks and there has been no replacement car parks being put in place.

There is up roar about this especially as staff have to pay to park. You can apply for a permit which costs £25 a month but these are now in short supply and to qualify for a permit you need to meet certain criteria. I remember when I was applying for my permit first off having a blue disabled parking badge did not move me up the line I still had to wait. I did eventually get a permit and was able to get a permit for a car park close to the hospital because of my blue badge but this to me is almost a waste of time because the welfare of the people working there is not addressed or prioritised.

For me and many others one of the biggest issues at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh is the smoking issue. There was a supposed smoking ban on NHS Lothian sites but what it seems to have done is nothing more than encourage people to smoke right outside the hospital doors. I remember just after the smoking ban came in I was working a night shift and halfway through hand over I had to get taken to A&E due to an asthma attack as a direct result of making my way into the hospital from my car. Sadly this was not the only occasion this occurred. There have been at least 6 occurrences where me getting from my car in the car park to the front door have resulted in me being exposed to people smoking where they should not be and ending up requiring hospital treatment and sometimes needing to go to intensive care.

Just now I am on a career break focusing on research but I am very concerned about going back to work next year. I will need to reapply for my permit but also if I don’t have a permit I will need to either pay for parking which is not always guaranteed, or risk getting public transport which could put my life at risk. I worry that will my hard work this year to get my health better be then set backwards by the risks that are involved in just getting into the hospital.

I have tried to speak to anyone who will listen about the smoking issue which is particularly bad at the Royal Infirmary but it seems to fall on deaf ears. The really shocking thing is that an area which is probably the worst for the number of people smoking is right below the respiratory ward and not even that is doing anything to get the smokers moved. I am not against people smoking- it is their choice if they want to end up giving themselves COPD and a self inflicted breathing condition but I am against them inflicting others to their bad habit. I didnt do anything to cause my lungs to get like this they are just like that so I do not expect to have them deteriorate as a direct consequence of someone breaking the law and smoking where they should not be working.

The most shocking bit about it is that the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh are happy to patrol the car parks and put tickets on cars which are parked in the wrong place but turn a blind eye to people smoking. I tell you a car parked in the wrong place does a lot less harm than people smoking.

When it comes to April 2020 I will need to think about wether it is worth the risk  to come back to work if the smoking issue is not addressed.

It is a sorry state of affairs when healthcare workers are questioning wether they continue in the career or where they are working because there is not adequate provision to support them.