Patient Centred Care

I have quite a few different blogs in my head after my last hospital admission due to a variety of things that happened.

Where better than to start at the beginning.

It was the usual start= difficulty breathing so did I usual nebuliser treatments and thought I should probably call 999 as I wasn’t getting much relief. The call handler was great. I normally just hang up but she stayed on the phone with me until the paramedics arrived which was good as it took a wee bit longer for them to come so she was able to distract me from focusing on being scared that I couldn’t breathe.

The paramedics did their usual. Although my blood pressure was through the roof which normally happens but later on. I think it just shows that I had been struggling for a while given how quickly it went up but also how quickly my heart rate was going too. Apparently the Western General doesn’t take emergency asthma attacks anymore as they are not equipped (despite going there in February) so I had to go over to the Royal Infirmary which isn’t my favourite but as it turns out it was a good thing I went there. So blue lights across town which is something I can never get my head round, part of me would love to be feeling well when going across town with the blue lights to see where they go and stuff but to have blue lights is really not a good thing so not being able to remember it is not good either. I would prefer to get myself across town to the hospital without needing an ambulance or not require the hospital at all.

The guys in A&E are fantastic straight into resus and getting sorted out. The challenge of getting a cannula in started and once they got it in the radiographer who was less than pleasant trying to get me into odd positions and not sympathetic to the situation did her best to pull it out and almost succeeded but for the quick hand of the Dr.

I did laugh though as the Consultant who I saw first uttered those words all asthmatics hate ‘just relax and concentrate on your breathing’. I wanted to throttle him. He was a really chatty guy so I couldn’t at the time get a word in to say to him what I wanted to but after they got some magnesium, hydrocortisone and aminophylline running I was starting to feel a bit better and could talk a bit more. When he next came in I was able to wave at him and tell him about the BMJ article I wrote. He said he found it really good as he had never thought of asthma in that way and he thought that it looked so difficult for us to talk so we just shouldn’t. I explained that if an asthmatic didnt want to talk they probably wouldn’t rather than try to fit their words in around their breathing. There was a noticeable change in how he treated me after he read the article and was obviously applying new learning which s really rewarding to see.

The slightly negative part of the whole time in A&E was that they sent ITU to come see me as they felt I needed to be there rather than going to a monitored bed in the assessment unit. Thankfully an ITU Dr who has seen me before was the one to review me and gave me more time to try and get on top of things. I did manage this and was significantly better but was shocked when a nurse came and told me that I was going to Intensive Care. If I’m honest this freaked me out a bit. I had assorts of things flying round my head. I though I was doing better and I was wondering what they knew that I didnt, were my numbers worse, was I tiring and the adrenaline of the attack was keeping me going. I was quite upset by the thought of it. I said to the nurse I didnt want to go, who then got a junior Dr who told me I needed to be there. The junior Dr got the consultant who by this time was a different one from earlier as the shifts changed.

This is where I cannot thank the A&E Dr enough. I thought I was in for it and going to be told I was unreasonable, and didnt know what was best for me because the Dr walked in looking at me carrying a chair, shut the curtains and sat down. At this point I thought she was going to tell me I had to go to ITU and had no choice etc. I was so wrong. She sat down and asked me how I felt and gave me her rationale for going to ITU. But I was able to tell her my fears of going to ITU and just that I felt significantly better from when ITU came and reviewed me. But also I was able to share my fears about ITU. Every attack I have now I end up in ITU or HDU. I honestly thought this time I was doing better and didnt need to go. The Consultant spoke to the on call Resp Reg about me and my concerns etc. It was agreed that I didnt need to go to ITU and could go to a monitored bed but should anything change and I get a little bit worse at all then there was a really low threshold for me to be moved to ITU.

What I really liked about the A&E Consultant was that she was all about the patient, and what is best for the patient, and involving the patient in the decisions about their care. When first taken into Resus you don’t get a say in what is happening as they are running around trying to save your life and that is their sole focus rather than if you want that or the next but the move out of resus and into the high care area sort of signals the change in care and is a move when the patient can be involved in their treatment and have input into what they think best and have discussion with Dr’s.

I was and still am so grateful for the Dr who took the time to speak to me and listen to me about my concerns of going to ITU and why I felt I didnt need to go there. I understand that if I need to go then I need to go and ultimately if after that chat the Dr still said I had to go to ITU I would go as I am not going to go against what the Dr’s say but being heard and listened to makes such a difference.

As it happens I needed up going to Critical Care anyway but that was due to an anaphylactic reaction which caused my chest to deteriorate rather than just an isolated deterioration in my asthma.

I must say this really was an excellent example of patient centred care and when patient centred care is appropriate and when it is not.

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