Getting medication on time.

I am not actually sure what title to give this post.

I was recently in a consultation type meeting with a range of service users to discuss the nursing program at one of the universities in Edinburgh. They are being revalidated and want to make sure that the course is producing the best possible nurses it can who are fully prepared for life as a staff nurse.

One thing that came up that has been preying on my mind and the more I think about it the more it bothers me. As the group was made up of a range of people age, gender, background, reason for being at the consultation. There were a few people there representing Parkinson’s- either as someone with Parkinson’s, a carer or someone who works for Parkinsons UK.

The issue of medication came up in conversation and it felt like some had a bit of an agenda as they kept going on about how people with Parkinson’s when in hospital must get their medications the right time otherwise their can be negative effects if it is late. This was a statement that was repeated many times stating that the medication often had to be given out with normal drug rounds.

It felt like to me that those with Parkinson’s,their medication was more important than other patients who need medication. I take medication which is prolonged release and has to be taken at specific times which are out with normal drug rounds and must be taken otherwise blood levels drop and this can have a detrimental effect on my breathing and could cause an attack which may or may not end up needing intensive care.

What bothered me so much is that there was no regard for other people and their conditions and the medication that they are on. I know from experience of doing drug rounds it is very difficult to juggle everything but we do our best. Every patient is just as important as the next and every patients medication is just as important to them as all the other patients. If a patient was able I would ask them to remind me to come and give them their medication if it was out with a drug round or if able I would let them self medicate so they would get their medication when it was due. This can not always be done so we as nurses need to remember and we do try. I was thinking as a nurse if I went into a bay of patients and only did one patients drugs and told the others they would get theirs done in time but this patient needed their now. It would make me feel like I was selecting this patient and treating them differently to the others.

What I am trying to get across is that every patient is just as important as the next and everyones medication is just as important to them as the next persons. There are many medications which like the medication for Parkinson’s needs to be given at set times otherwise there is detrimental effects. I really felt like there was no regard for other people and their condition. Parkinsons is an awful condition and I have a good friend who has had Parkinson’s since the age of 8 but getting medication on time is just as important for us as well.

Im not sure if I am saying thins properly and if its making sense but everyone is just as important and medication  being on time is no more important for someone with Parkinson’s than someone with diabetes or asthma for example.

As a patient I advocate for myself. I ask the nurses if I can self medicate that way I remove the anxiety that can develop if I am not able to get medication when I need it. For example if my chest is very wheezy I am able to put a nebuliser on and then let the nurses know, or if my prolonged release theophylline is due I ask the nurses for it or if they are doing a drug round ahead of time I ask if they can leave it out so I can take it when it was time. Nurses try their best and do what they can but we as patients need to advocate for ourselves to make sure we get what we need when we need it but doing it in a way that is not being disruptive and demanding.

I hope I have not come across as disregarding people with Parkinson’s and the importance of their medication as I know it is important but other medications for people are just as important. I always worry when I attend these type of consultations when there is a few who seem to have an agenda or dominate conversation.

I am going to leave this now but would appreciate others thoughts on this post as it has had me thinking a lot.

Cold to chest infection to….

Getting a cold to many is an inconvenience. To a severe asthmatic getting a cold fills you with dread because generally our lungs are fantastic hosts to cold bugs leaving us with rip roaring chest infections.

During the winter months you cant avoid the common cold, well you could but that would mean you become a hermit and prisoner in your own home. Im not going to do that. I like being out and about too much.

The last two weeks have been pretty hard work. I picked up a common cold which filled me with dread. I think it filled my mum with dread as well especially as she was going away and this is the first time I have picked anything since that last horrific attack.

As with most asthmatics despite my best efforts it went to my chest. I had a great chest infection with an impressive cough that drove me round the bend. Even Ghillie was getting irritated with my constant coughing.

I wish I could say I dealt with this infection well but it has filled me with anxiety and I have not managed it as well as perhaps I may have in the past. I knew the first bout of illness post last attack was going to be hard. I had a fear that I would end up on that slippery slope back down to needing a ventilator. Extreme I know but could potentially be a possibility.

Thankfully staying in touch with my team I was able to keep it at bay and not get too bad. My peak flow has dropped significantly but the antibiotics and increase in steroids have helped bring it back up along with a lot of i still have this irrational fear that really hits me at night that my infection may not be better and I am missing something. Morning comes round and I think I am so silly for getting in such a state about it.

I have been doing less than I would normally do while I have had the infection. Mainly because I have been terrified of making my chest kick off. It has been a strange time because I thought I would be able to write some blog posts, do some other research stuff but I just have not had the imagination or concentration (lack of concentration is something I have been struggling a lot with post ICU).

I am also very happy that I have had my flu jab so my chances of getting flu are reduced. I would urge everyone to get it that can get it!

The good thing is, the infection is clearing well and my asthma has not kicked off too much. Ghillie of course has been very attentive and by my side all the time!

IMG_5846

Feeling much better and more positive!!

Its now the end of the week and since my last post things have been a lot better. I must say the support I have received over this week from others who also have chronic health issues has been over whelming. It was both reassuring and shocking to read comments from people saying they could have written what I did as it could have been them. This is awful that so many people are struggling with their conditions and feeling isolated but then also gave me reassurance to know I am not over reacting about the situation I find myself in but it is perfectly normal.

But this shouldn’t be perfectly normal when living with a chronic health condition. It has really rocked me reading all these comments. I thought maybe one or two people might have had a period of time feeling similar but not the sheer number. It has really made me want to do something to try and combat this but I am not sure how and I am not sure what to do.

The wanting to do something was reinforced today even more so when I met up with another severe asthmatic in Edinburgh. It was so easy to talk and even though we had only met through a support group it was easy to chat and there was a mutual understanding of how shit life can be with severe asthma and the restrictions it can put on your life.

Feeling a lot more positive about things now and know I am not alone and can ask for help. It is not a weakness to need help but a strength to recognise when you need to ask for help.

Tomorrow I have a busy day as it is the Leith Gala Day at Leith Links and the ICU Steps Edinburgh support group which I am part of have a stall at it to raise some money for the charity and raise some awareness about us and what we are there for. In-between doing that I am at the Sick Kids for the launch of a children’s patient and public involvement group too and will speak briefly about my experience of being in a PPI group. After that a trip up to Thurso to see family to really clear the cobwebs and reset the clock ready to face the world again.