Asthma Death in Children

There is so much research into asthma just now looking at a cure for asthma, better management, getting asthmatics to comply with treatment better but research into asthma death, often a taboo subject to talk about is vital to make any change in the shocking asthma statistics.

Ann an children’s asthma nurse specialist is also one of the PhD students at the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research. Her PhD is looking to speak to parents of children who have died from asthma.

The importance of this I think is two fold.

Initially the whole concept of this PhD came from one of the Patient and Public Involvement Leads at AUKCAR whose own daughter died from asthma. Having a PPI member come up with the research idea and the centre then backing it really highlights just how much AUKCAR values the patient and public group by implementing project ideas that come from them.

Secondly this PhD is so vital. Only a few months back it was revealed that across Europe, the UK has the worst rate of asthma deaths and a rate that we all hoped would improve after the National Review of Asthma Death (NRAD) was published in 2014. However this is not the case.

In the UK death is very much a taboo subject. People don’t like using the term death or died. You see the term passed away or lost- you don’t lose someone if they die because if you go looking you won’t find them again. Asthma death is just that and I know people who have had family members die from asthma also do not like the term lost.

For the first time research is being undertaken by an asthma nurse specialist who deals with a number of people with severe and life threatening asthma. Rather than speaking to medical staff, Dr’s and nurses Ann is going to be speaking with those directly affected by asthma death. Ann wants to speak to parents or carers whose child has died as a result of asthma. Speaking to you will mean we can learn from your experience and make a change for the future.

Have you been affected by asthma death in the last 10 years (in or after 2008)? Has your child died between he age of 5-24 and you were there with them. Would you like to speak to Ann and help make a change for the future?

All you need to do is email Ann: ann.mcmurray@ed.ac.uk or by phone/ text on 07976582297. You will have a single face to face chat with Ann in a place that you are comfortable which will last no longer than 2 hours.

The study has been reviewed by the West of Scotland Research Ethics Committee 3 (WoSREC3) and Patient Public Involvement volunteers of the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research (AUKCAR).

 

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